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Injuries Get Cold Shoulder

August 26, 2008

THOSE who work out or play regular sport know the theory behind icing an injury, but those who are really hard core go for kriotherapy.

The principle is the same. Icing an injured area can substantially decrease the extent of the damage. It achieves this in a number of different ways:

Decreasing the amount of bleeding by vasoconstriction into the injury site and so lessening swelling.

Reducing pain and muscle spasm.

Reducing the risk of cell death by decreasing the rate of metabolism.

However kriotherapy takes this to a whole new level. Instead of just applying an ice pack, kriotherapy involves walking into a freezing cold chamber – with temperatures dropping to as much as – 135C. Imagine a sauna in reverse and you get the idea.

Sportsmen such as jockey Tony McCoy and the Harlequins and Wasps rugby union teams have used it to help heal after injury as it awakens the body’s healing response, stimulating circulation and immune function.

But by easing muscular tension and boosting the circulation, not to mention encouraging the release of endorphins, kriotherapy can bring about a more relaxed and calm sense of being. It has also been used to treat depression.

Kriotherapy is thought to be beneficial for those suffering from sleep dysfunction, fatigue, menstrual pain, back pain, rheumatic inflammation, psoriasis and even infertility.

In addition it is said to improve the appearance of cellulite, rejuvenate the skin and increase immunity. Contraindications include ailments such as Reynaud’s Disease, epilepsy, diabetes and pregnancy.

Warm up again – you feel exhilarated and refreshed.

It should be an obligatory start to every day!

Kriotherapy is now available at Champneys Tring. Priced pounds 35 for a 25-minute session and subsequent Sessions pounds 25. Go to www.

champneys.com for more details.

(c) 2008 Evening Mail; Birmingham (UK). Provided by ProQuest LLC. All rights Reserved.




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