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What is the Optimal Method of Ischemia Evaluation in WomeN

September 13, 2008

To: MEDICAL EDITORS

Contact: Beth Hodge, +1-240-429-9983, bhodge@asnc.org, or Steve Carter, +1-301-802-7100, scarter@asnc.org, both of the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology

BOSTON, Sept. 13 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Cardiovascular disease kills more women each year than all cancers combined. Although this statistic is gaining more recognition among physicians and patients, the unique risk factors and symptoms of female patients make diagnosis and prognosis of women with heart disease particularly challenging.

Data from the WOMEN Study: What is the Optimal Method of Ischemia Evaluation in WomeN presented today at the American Society of Nuclear Cardiology Annual Scientific Session seeks to compare exercise stress testing alone or with myocardial perfusion imaging to determine the best method for detecting heart disease in symptomatic women. The study goal is to determine the best method based upon a 2 year follow-up. Researchers will present baseline data from the study, including demographics, pre-test likelihood of coronary artery disease, and initial test results.

“The strength of this study is the large enrollment and careful follow-up to optimize diagnostic strategies in symptomatic women,” said Dr. Gary Heller, who will be presenting data at today’s meeting on behalf of the four investigators who initiated the study — Drs. Gary Heller, Robert Hendel, Jennifer Mieres, and Leslee Shaw. “The goal of the study is to improve outcomes in women with coronary artery disease by earlier and better detection.”

During a two-year recruitment period, 826 patients were enrolled from 46 sites. Entry criteria were based on American College of Cardiology guidelines and the ability to exercise as determined by the Duke Activity Status (DASI) questionnaire. Women were randomized to either electrocardiogram exercise tolerance testing (ETT) alone or ETT with Tc-99m tetrofosmin SPECT myocardial perfusion imaging. Ongoing results are monitored by a Data Safety and Monitoring Board with all events adjudicated. Major adverse cardiac events will be evaluated at one and two years.

Dr. Gary Heller will present this study, “What Is the Optimal Method for Ischemia Evaluation in Women: Preliminary Data from the WOMENs Trial” Saturday, September 13, 2008 at 10:50 a.m. in Room 306.

The American Society of Nuclear Cardiology (ASNC) is the leader in education, advocacy, and quality for the field of nuclear cardiology. Serving more than 5,000 individuals in over 50 countries, ASNC is the only professional association dedicated to the dynamic subspecialty of nuclear cardiology.

SOURCE American Society of Nuclear Cardiology

(c) 2008 U.S. Newswire. Provided by ProQuest LLC. All rights Reserved.




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