Quantcast

Standing Together to Improve Hemophilia Treatment

April 15, 2009

World Hemophilia Day brings together the global bleeding disorders community

MONTREAL, April 15 /PRNewswire/ — Behind every person with hemophilia is a much needed team of support. This April 17 marks the 20th anniversary of World Hemophilia Day where hemophilia organizations around the world increase awareness of hemophilia and other bleeding disorders.

This year’s World Hemophilia Day campaign, “Together, We Care”, focuses on the importance of comprehensive care, which is central to treating the physical, emotional, psychological, social, and educational needs of people with hemophilia and other bleeding disorders. This is best done through a multidisciplinary approach where all key healthcare professionals come together in specialized care teams to look after all the treatment requirements of the patient.

Involving a specialized comprehensive care team in hemophilia care ensures:

  • Accurate diagnosis
  • Prompt and effective treatment
  • Fewer hospitalizations
  • Healthy joints and muscles
  • Support for families

On April 17, World Hemophilia Day, the World Federation of Hemophilia (WFH) is launching a video podcast titled “Together, We Care: A Comprehensive Approach to Bleeding Disorders” at www.wfh.org/whd. This video podcast, made possible with funding from Baxter Healthcare Corporation, highlights the impact and benefits of comprehensive care.

Comprehensive care is important for patients with bleeding disorders in both developing and developed countries. “It may not exist in developing countries and may be threatened in developed countries by government budget cuts and other measures affecting the delivery of healthcare,” said Mark Skinner, WFH president. “Our vision of Treatment for All means more than just treatment products. It also means diagnosis, care and treatment by a multidisciplinary team of trained health care specialists.”

Visit www.wfh.org for more information about World Hemophilia Day. The World Hemophilia Day website is supported by Bayer and Baxter.

The “Together, We Care” campaign is part of the WFH’s continuing efforts to improve care for people with inherited bleeding disorders around the world.

About hemophilia and other bleeding disorders

One in 5,000 boys is born with hemophilia. This means that their blood does not clot properly and this can often be fatal due to internal bleeding. However, with proper care and management, patients with hemophilia and bleeding disorders can lead a longer, healthier life.

Hemophilia, von Willebrand disease, and other factor deficiencies are lifelong bleeding disorders that prevent blood from clotting properly. People with bleeding disorders do not have enough of a particular clotting factor, a protein in blood that controls bleeding, or it does not work properly. The severity of a person’s bleeding disorder usually depends on the amount of clotting factor that is missing or not working. People with hemophilia can experience uncontrolled internal bleeding that can result from a seemingly minor injury. Bleeding into joints and muscles causes severe pain and disability. Bleeding into major organs, such as the brain, can cause death.

About the World Federation of Hemophilia (WFH)

The World Federation of Hemophilia (WFH) is an international not-for-profit organization dedicated to improving the lives of people with hemophilia and related bleeding disorders. Established in 1963, it is a global network of patient organizations in 113 countries and has official recognition from the World Health Organization. Visit WFH online at www.wfh.org.

SOURCE World Federation of Hemophilia (WFH)


Source: newswire



comments powered by Disqus