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Hybrid Surgery Benefits Colorectal Patients

April 16, 2009

 Despite rapid strides in minimally invasive surgical techniques “” most notably, laparoscopy “” traditional open surgery remains the most common surgical option across the United States for people with diseases of the rectum and colon.

A newer, third option is a hybrid “” hand-assisted laparoscopic surgery (HALS). The approach is safe and effective and compares favorably with standard laparoscopy, according to a team of colorectal surgical specialists at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center in their study published in a recent issue of the Journal of the American College of Surgeons.

“Laparoscopy offers clear benefits to patients compared with open surgery, including a dramatically smaller incision, less pain and shorter recovery time. But bowel surgery can be highly complex, so sometimes a human hand is helpful,” says Dr. Toyooki Sonoda, the lead author of the study, a surgeon at NewYork-Presbyterian Hospital/Weill Cornell Medical Center, and assistant professor of clinical surgery at Weill Cornell Medical College.

Patients with ulcerative colitis, Crohn’s disease, diverticulitis or colorectal cancer may be candidates for partial or total removal of the colon or rectum (colectomy or proctocolectomy). Increasingly, and especially at leading medical centers like NewYork-Presbyterian/Weill Cornell, these life-saving procedures are performed laparoscopically.

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