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Weight gain more likely from beverages

April 23, 2009

Weight gain is more likely to increase as a result of liquid calories, particularly sugar-sweetened beverages, than solid food calories, U.S. researchers said.

Lead author Dr. Liwei Chen of the Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center said the study reports four principal findings: a reduction in liquid calorie intake was significantly associated with weight loss at both six months and 18 months; the weight-loss effect of a reduction in liquid calorie intake was stronger than that of a reduction in solid calorie intake; a reduction in sugar-sweetened beverage intake was significantly associated with weight loss at both six and 18 months; and no other beverage type was associated with weight change.

Today, Americans consume 150-300 more calories a day than they did 30 years ago, and caloric beverages account for approximately 50 percent of this increase, Chen said in a statement.

The researchers tracked 810 men and women ages 25-79 whose 24-hour dietary intake recall was measured by telephone interviews conducted when they entered the study and at six and 18 months.

The absence of chewing when consuming liquids may result in decreased pancreatic responses and beverages also clear the stomach sooner than solid food and may induce weaker satiety signals, the researchers said.

The findings are published in May 1 issue of the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.


Source: upi



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