Quantcast

Workforce Swine Flu Pandemic Survival Preparedness Tips For Business

April 29, 2009

DALLAS, April 29 /PRNewswire/ — Employers should encourage employees and their families to take the following steps:

  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick. When you are sick, keep your distance from others to protect them from getting sick too.
  • Stay home when you are sick to help prevent others from catching your illness. Cover your mouth and nose.
  • Cover your mouth and nose with a tissue when coughing or sneezing. It may prevent those around you from getting sick.
  • Clean your hands to protect yourself from germs.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, nose or mouth.
  • Germs are often spread when a person touches something that is contaminated with germs and then touches his or her eyes, nose, or mouth.
  • Practice other good health habits. Get plenty of sleep, be physically active, manage your stress, drink plenty of fluids, and eat nutritious food.

Employers also should be sensitive to workplace policies or practices that may pressure employees with a contagious disease to report to work despite an illness and consider whether the employer should adjust these policies temporarily or permanently in light of the impending health risk. For instance, financial pressures and the design and enforcement of policies regarding working from home and/or qualifying for paid or unpaid time off significantly impact the decisions employees make about whether to come to work when first experiencing symptoms of illness.

If considering allowing or requiring employees to work from home, employers need to implement appropriate safeguards to monitor and manage employee performance, and to protect the employer’s ability to comply with applicable wage and hour, worker’s compensation, safety, privacy and other legal and operational requirements. Finally, employers should begin preparing backup staffing and production strategies.

Employers also should be sensitive to workplace policies or practices that may pressure employees with a contagious disease to report to work despite an illness and consider whether the employer should adjust these policies temporarily or permanently in light of the impending health risk. If considering allowing or requiring employees to work from home, employers need to implement safeguards to monitor employee performance, and protect the employer’s ability to comply with wage and hour, worker’s compensation, safety, privacy and other legal and operational requirements.

For more information, contact Cindy Stamer at 469-767-8872 or cstamer@cttlegal.com

SOURCE Cindy Stamer


Source: newswire



comments powered by Disqus