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The Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease Highlights Anti-Cancer Activities of the Food Extracts Quercetin, EGCG, Glycyrrhizin, and Trans-Cinnamaldehyde

May 7, 2009

ROCHESTER, N.Y., May 7 /PRNewswire/ — Recent scientific studies published in the medical journals Cancer Research, Carcinogenesis, Oncology, British Journal of Urology, Journal of Nutrition, and others, showed that the food extracts Quercetin, EGCG, Glycyrrhizin, and Trans-Cinnamaldehyde have anti-cancer activities.

Gene-Eden is a dietary supplement that includes all four food extracts in a unique, patent-pending formulation. Gene-Eden was introduced in February 2009 following extensive research on the anti-cancer activities of certain food extracts. Gene-Eden is manufactured and marketed in the US and Israel.

On Gene-Eden, see http://www.gene-eden.com.

Some Scientific Studies:

Quercetin (a compound found in capers, apples, red onion, and other foods)

1. Nothlings U, et al. A food pattern that is predictive of flavonol intake and risk of pancreatic cancer. Am J Clin Nutr. 2008 Dec;88(6):1653-62.

2. Knekt P, et al. Flavonoid intake and risk of chronic diseases. Am J Clin Nutr. 2002 Sep;76(3):560-8.

3. Cruz-Correa M, et al. Combination treatment with curcumin and quercetin of adenomas in familial adenomatous polyposis. Clin Gastroenterol Hepatol. 2006 Aug;4(8):1035-8.

EGCG (a compound found in green tea)

1. Bettuzzi S, et al. Chemoprevention of human prostate cancer by oral administration of green tea catechins in volunteers with high-grade prostate intraepithelial neoplasia: a preliminary report from a one-year proof-of-principle study. Cancer Res. 2006 Jan 15;66(2):1234-40.

2. Zhang M, et al. Green tea and the prevention of breast cancer: a case-control study in Southeast China. Carcinogenesis. 2007 May;28(5):1074-8.

Glycyrrhizin (a compound found in the liquorice root)

1. Kumada H. Long-term treatment of chronic hepatitis C with glycyrrhizin [stronger neo-minophagen C (SNMC)] for preventing liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Oncology. 2002;62 Suppl 1:94-100.

2. Ikeda K, et al. A long-term glycyrrhizin injection therapy reduces hepatocellular carcinogenesis rate in patients with interferon-resistant active chronic hepatitis C: a cohort study of 1249 patients. Dig Dis Sci. 2006 Mar;51(3):603-9.

Trans-Cinnamaldehyde (a compound found in the bark of cinnamon trees)

1. Cabello CM, et al. The cinnamon-derived Michael acceptor cinnamic aldehyde impairs melanoma cell proliferation, invasiveness, and tumor growth. Free Radic Biol Med. 2009 Jan 15;46(2):220-31.

For details on these studies, see http://www.gene-eden.com/cancer-studies.htm.

About:

The Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease (http://www.cbcd.net) is a non-profit center with a mission to advance the research on the biology of chronic disease, and to accelerate the discovery of a cure for these diseases.

    Contact:

    Tal Davidson
    Phone: 585-200-5546
    Email: tdavidson@cbcd.net

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SOURCE Center for the Biology of Chronic Disease


Source: newswire



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