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NephCure Foundation Announces Research Grant Program Recipients

July 28, 2009

Seven applicants receive a total of over $1.7 million

BERWYN, Pa., July 28 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — The NephCure Foundation (NCF) has awarded more than $1.7 million to researchers in its 2009 Scientific Research Grant Program.

The announcement was made by Henry Brehm, NephCure Foundation’s Executive Director and Dr. Lawrence Holzman, Chair of the NCF Scientific Advisory Board.

The Scientific Grant Program supports basic, transitional and clinical research initiatives to understand the cause, identify treatments and find the cure for primary focal segmental glomerulosclerosis (FSGS) and Nephrotic Syndrome (NS). To date, The NephCure Foundation has committed over $6 million to research and education, including $1.6 million for the 2008 Scientific Research Grant Program.

Post-Doctoral Fellowship grants were awarded to:

  • Sebastian Martini, M.D. of University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI
  • Hideki Kato, M.D., Ph.D. of Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY

Young Investigator Grants were awarded to:

  • Christian Faul, Ph.D. of University of Miami, Miami, FL
  • Valerie Anne Schumacher, Ph.D. of Children’s Hospital Boston, Boston, MA
  • Kirk Campbell M.D. of University of Miami, Miami, FL
  • Mira Krendel, Ph.D. of SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse, NY

Established Investigator New Direction Grant awarded to:

  • Sanja Sever, Ph.D. of Massachusetts General Hospital, Boston, MA

The NephCure Foundation launched the grant program in 2008, providing funding for basic, translational and clinical research into two potentially devastating kidney conditions, FSGS and NS. Since the inaugural year, the program has seen nearly a 150 percent increase in the number of applications received. This is indicative of NephCure’s growth and increasing role as the leading advocate for research into NS and FSGS.

NS and FSGS are conditions that affect the tiny filtering units (glomeruli) in the kidney. The result is that protein needed by the body is discarded into the urine. Over time, these conditions can result in renal failure and the need for dialysis or a kidney transplant. The primary cause for most forms of NS and FSGS are not known and there is no cure.

The NephCure Foundation has a unique challenge in identifying patient families. Privacy laws preclude doctors from providing information and because FSGS and NS are invisible, people tend to struggle with them silently. Therefore, NephCure uses publicity and public service announcements to find people suffering from the diseases.

SOURCE NephCure Foundation


Source: newswire



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