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Attorneys Learn of the Association Between Traumatic Brain Injury, Hormonal Deficiencies, Depression, and Heart Attacks

August 13, 2009

ENCINO, Calif., Aug. 13 /PRNewswire/ — An increasing number of Attorneys specializing in Traumatic Brain Injury arising out of motor vehicle accidents, slip and falls, closed head trauma, and blunt head trauma are becoming aware of the concurrent hormonal deficiencies that impede rehabilitation by their affect on psychological, physiological, and physical functioning.

Many are receiving additional training in the area of Interventional Endocrinology to give them the advantage of understanding that head trauma has a two-phase insult on the body. The first: an acute phase, is associated with the gross manifestations of the injury (loss of consciousness, amnesia, cognitive impairment, fatigue, mood changes, and structural damage to the brain) and a second: the delayed phase, leading to progressive loss of one or more hormones within 3 months of the injury. Many times, the first phase is so subtle that the recognition of the second phase is significantly delayed or ignored.

The trauma can be mild, moderate, or severe and still cause the brain’s ability to regulate important, life-maintaining, hormones to fail.

The loss of these hormones increases the risk of heart attack, stroke, emotional instability, depression, anxiety, mood swings, memory loss, fatigue, confusion, amnesia, poor cognition, learning disabilities, decreased communication skills, poor healing, frequent infections, poor fracture healing, poor skin quality, increased body fat, decreased muscle strength and size, infertility, and loss of sex drive.

These finding are not new, and neither are the present treatments that still consist of psychotherapy with or without anti-depressants or other drugs that just mask the symptoms.

This “stealth” condition can be detected with cost-effective and appropriate laboratory testing surveying an array of hormones and their markers. If there are hormonal deficiencies, treatment consists of returning them to a natural, physiological level.

In 2007, Dr. Mark L. Gordon introduced the association of head trauma (TBI) with the on-set of hormonal dysfunction leading to deficiencies on the program ESPN: Outside the Lines. In that same year, his book The Clinical Application of Interventional Endocrinology, offered the medical documentation to support the causes, clinical findings, laboratory testing, specific hormone replacement strategies, and the outcomes for Traumatic Brain Injury associated with hormonal dysfunction.

For further information, please visit http://www.tbimedlegal.com.

    Contact

    Mr. David Fennoy
    1-626-794-3648
    info@tbimedlegal.com
    The Millennium Health Centers, Inc.
    American Academy of Interventional Endocrinology(TM)

This release was issued through eReleases(TM). For more information, visit http://www.ereleases.com.

SOURCE The Millennium Health Centers, Inc.


Source: newswire



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