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Monitoring for Fever Can Help With Early Detection of H1N1 – ‘Swine Flu’

August 26, 2009

SOUTHBOROUGH, Mass., Aug. 26 /PRNewswire/ — From summer camps to summer travel, the H1N1 influenza has taken a toll worldwide this season, and experts say the new flu strain is expected to be back in force this fall. Forty percent of Americans could end up being affected by the H1N1 flu, the CDC reported last month. Recently, the CDC elevated its H1N1 alert to pandemic status, its highest level. What does this mean for families? It’s important to have a reliable, accurate, and easy-to-use thermometer on hand to monitor for fever, one of the first signs of illness.

The Braun ThermoScan(R) Ear Thermometer is used by more pediatricians in the U.S. than any other brand, according to a recent national survey.(1) This advanced thermometer features patented technology, such as its pre-warmed tip and positioning guidance system that ensures accuracy every time. The Braun ThermoScan Ear Thermometer is also proven to be more accurate than rectal(2) and temple measurements.(3) The Braun ThermoScan Ear Thermometer is not only used by most pediatricians, but also by more moms than any other ear thermometer.(4)

As with seasonal flu, fever is one of the first symptoms of the H1N1 flu virus. Monitoring fever is particularly important for individuals with a greater risk of infection, including infants, children, pregnant women, and the elderly. Ear thermometer measurements are preferred by pediatricians because they are fast, accurate, easy-to-use and hygienic. The eardrum shares the blood supply with the temperature control center in the brain; therefore, changes in body temperature are reflected sooner in the ear than at any other part of the body.

The Braun ThermoScan Ear Thermometer features a multiple memory function, allowing to you monitor the progress of a fever, which can be important when communicating with a doctor. The thermometer also comes with disposable lens filters, which reduce the transmission of germs. The lens filters should be changed after each use.

For tips on temperature taking, visit www.coldandflucentral.com.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that any child younger than 3 months who has a fever should see a pediatrician. An ear reading of 100.4 degrees F or higher is generally considered a fever. For adults, the WHO recommends that a person should seek medical care if a fever continues more than three days. For more information on the H1N1 flu virus, visit the CDC.gov 2009 H1N1 Flu and PandemicFlu.gov websites.

The Thermoscan Ear Thermometer is manufactured by Kaz, Inc. under a license to the ‘Braun’ trademark. ‘Braun’ is a registered trademark of Braun GmbH, Kronberg, Germany.

(1) Based on a survey of pediatricians in the United States. 2009, March. Arendt Consulting. Pediatrician Thermometer Claims Substantiation.

(2/3) Measurements in detecting temperature changes. Nimah M et al; “Evaluation of infrared tympanic thermometry. . .” Pediatric Critical Care Med 2003; 4 (3): A74

(4) Based on syndicated ear and temple thermometer data.

SOURCE Kaz, Inc.


Source: newswire



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