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Global Team for Local Initiatives Awarded $387,000 by USAID: New Model for Indigenous Health in Ethiopia

October 7, 2009

Ancient Hamar Tribe Adopts Sustainable Hygiene and Water Programs to Prevent Water-borne and Communicable Disease

BAINBRIDGE ISLAND, Wash., Oct. 7 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Northwest-based nonprofit Global Team for Local Initiatives (GTLI) has been awarded a $387,000 grant by US Agency for International Development (USAID) to help the organization implement clean water and sanitation programs in Ethiopia. Since 2008, GTLI, which incubated a new community-based model, has successfully completed a risk assessment of the threatened Hamar tribe, developed training programs with tribal elders, and is ready to deliver hygiene training, wells and cisterns to 3,000 people in four communities.

“We are thrilled that USAID is investing in a new type of recipient that measures the adoption of new behaviors,” said GTLI Founder and Country Director Lori Sweningson. “USAID saw the value in our comprehensive needs analysis and the importance of building trust and a relationship with elders prior to developing programs. This will result in sustainable behavior change.”

According to Sweningson, the project allows GTLI to have an immediate impact on the lives of Hamar women and children who currently are entirely responsible for fetching water.

“In Wonga Bayno, many women travel up to three hours one way during the wet season and up to six hours in the dry season to fetch their daily allotment. Girls are not allowed to attend school as they are required to fetch water and tend younger children,” said Sweningson.

“Our USAID/GTLI partnership is committed to providing this ancient people, affected by drought, shrinking grasslands and disease, an opportunity to gain the skills they need for continued survival.”

Global Team for Local Initiatives

Global Team for Local Initiatives (www.gtli.us), founded in 2008, is a nonprofit organization dedicated to working in partnership with threatened indigenous cultures so that traditions are respected and all people — especially women and children — have the opportunity to live a healthy life.

The Hamar

The 23,000 Hamar people of Ethiopia are pastoralists who, due to severe and worsening drought, are in a state of crisis. They have few sources of clean water and are unable to grow enough food to feed themselves year-round. Starvation, dehydration and disease are rampant.

For information about Global Team for Local Initiatives visit www.gtli.us.

For information about USAID visit www.usaid.gov.

SOURCE Global Team for Local Initiatives (GTLI)


Source: newswire



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