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Last updated on April 21, 2014 at 9:11 EDT

Blocking Cell Movement For Cancer, MS Treatment

February 11, 2010

University of Adelaide researchers in Australia are finding new ways to block the movement of cells in the body which can cause autoimmune diseases and the spread of cancer.

Led by Professor of Immunology Shaun McColl, the researchers have identified molecular “receptors” on the surface of cells which are involved in helping cells migrate to sites where they can cause disease.

“A number of diseases like cancer and autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis and arthritis, involve the inappropriate migration of cells,” says Professor McColl.

“Our research shows that these receptors which help the cells migrate can be blocked pharmacologically, preventing the cell migration which causes the disease.”

The researchers have identified a number of such receptors in multiple sclerosis and have developed potential therapeutic drugs that could control this disease, and other autoimmune diseases.

They are also in the process of identifying receptors on the surface of metastatic cancer cells.

“These are exciting research outcomes and will offer new treatments for these diseases which affect millions of people,” says Professor McColl.

Professor McColl is Head of Chemokine Biology, Deputy Head of the School of Molecular and Biomedical Science and Deputy Executive Dean of the Faculty of Sciences at the University of Adelaide.

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