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Spirited Celebrations During the Holidays Can Mark the Beginning of a Problem

November 5, 2010

CHICAGO, Nov. 5, 2010 /PRNewswire/ — Many see the holidays as a time to celebrate, but when does the celebrating go too far? One in three high school teens say they are allowed to drink at home for special events like holidays, according to a recent study from Students Against Destructive Decisions and Liberty Mutual Group. Among college students, studies show the numbers rise to 80 percent consuming alcohol.

But Kimberly Dennis, M.D. and medical director at Timberline Knolls Residential Treatment Center, one of the leading residential treatment centers for alcoholism, drug abuse and eating disorders, says in her treatment of people with addictions, she has found evidence that innocent exposure to alcohol with the family and during the holidays can too often mark the beginning of a problem.

“Drinking during the holidays and for special occasions is commonly dismissed as traditional, and therefore ‘okay,’” said Dr. Dennis. “But parents don’t realize that when children begin drinking at a young age, they are more likely to develop substance abuse problems later in life and risk becoming more susceptible to the complicating factors alcohol has for adults, both physically, emotionally and socially.”

To help parents of teens and young adults facing the “spirits” of the holiday season, Dr. Dennis offers the following advice:

Talk with your child about the realities of alcohol and substance use and abuse before it becomes an issue. Be open about your own positions and habits, and be clear with your expectations. The best conversations come from a non-judgmental, non-pressured dialogue, not from cross-examination after the fact.

Advise children about risks they face (for themselves and others) in consuming alcohol — drunk driving, spiked drinks, alcohol poisoning and blackouts. They are often exposed to “accepted” drinking at the neighborhood holiday party, and are left unprepared for the realities of consumption in an unsupervised environment. The common reaction is “it won’t happen to me,” but parents need to help their children realize the truth … it can, and it does.

Watch for signs that your child may be drinking. While denial is one of the first signs of an alcoholic, it is also one of the first reactions a parent will have to a child with a substance abuse problem. Is your child depressed, anxious, stressed, apathetic, or irritable? Be realistic about the cause for their erratic behavior or coming in the door past curfew. Address your concerns honestly and directly with your teen.

Dr. Dennis says it’s devastating to see the number of families and individuals who suffered for not recognizing and addressing problems with alcohol when they began. Model appropriate alcohol use or abstinence. Children watch their parents, though it may not be obvious. So, be a good role model while verbalizing your concerns.

Experimentation and sampling are normal parts of development, but should not be confused with risk-taking behaviors.

About Timberline Knolls Residential Treatment Center

Timberline Knolls is one of the leading residential treatment centers for eating disorders, alcoholism and substance abuse, with or without trauma, a dual diagnosis or cooccurring disorder. Expert treatment staff offers a nurturing environment of recovery for women and girls (ages 12 and older) on a wooded 43-acre campus in suburban Chicago. Women and families seeking Christian treatment have the option of working with a dedicated Christian therapist. For more information on Timberline Knolls Residential Treatment Center, call us at 877.257.9611.

SOURCE Timberline Knolls Residential Treatment Center


Source: newswire



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