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Antibiotic Selection Pressure And Macrolide Resistance In Nasopharyngeal Streptococcus Pneumoniae

December 15, 2010

Jeremy Keenan and colleagues report that during a cluster-randomized clinical trial in Ethiopia, nasopharyngeal pneumococcal resistance to macrolides was significantly higher in communities randomized to receive azithromycin compared with untreated control communities.

Funding: The National Institutes of Health (NEI U10 EY016214) was the main supporter of this trial. This project was also supported by the Bernard Osher Foundation, That Man May See, the Harper Inglis Trust, the Bodri Foundation, the South Asia Research Fund, Research to Prevent Blindness, NIH/NCRR/OD UCSF-CTSI KL2 RR024130, and NIH/NEI K23EY019071. The International Trachoma Initiative generously donated the azithromycin used for this study. The funders of the trial had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or the preparation of the manuscript.

Competing Interests: James H Jorgensen was an Advisory board member for BD Diagnostics and has received research support from BD Diagnostics, bioMerieux, Merck and Pfizer.

Citation: Skalet AH, Cevallos V, Ayele B, Gebre T, Zhou Z, et al. (2010) Antibiotic Selection Pressure and Macrolide Resistance in Nasopharyngeal Streptococcus pneumoniae: A Cluster-Randomized Clinical Trial. PLoS Med 7(12): e1000377. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1000377

IN YOUR COVERAGE PLEASE USE THIS URL TO PROVIDE ACCESS TO THE FREELY AVAILABLE PAPER:

http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.1000377

PRESS-ONLY PREVIEW OF THE ARTICLE: www.plos.org/press/plme-07-12-keenan.pdf

CONTACT:Jeremy Keenan
University of California San Francisco
Francis.I. Proctor Foundation for Research in Ophthamology
513 Parnassus Ave, Med Sci S309
San Francisco
CA 94143-0412
United States of America
+1 415 476 1442
+1 415 476 0527 (fax)
Jeremy.Keenan@ucsf.edu

Nuclear Receptor Expression Defines a Set of Prognostic Biomarkers for Lung Cancer

David Mangelsdorf and colleagues show that nuclear receptor expression is strongly associated with clinical outcomes of lung cancer patients, and this expression profile is a potential prognostic signature for lung cancer patient survival time, particularly for individuals with early stage disease.

Funding: This work was funded by the Howard Hughes Medical Institute (DJM), Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas grant RP101251 (JDM and DJM); National Institutes of Health grants U19 DK62434 (DJM), P50 CA70907 (IIW, JDM, DJM), UL1 RR024982 (GX and YX), and CA152301 (YX); a Robert A. Welch Foundation grant I-1275 (DJM); the Gillson Longenbaugh Foundation (JDM); DOD VITAL and PROSPECT (IIW, JDM); and a National Center for Research Resources grant for the North and Central Texas Clinical and Translational Science Initiative (UL1RR024982 to YJ). The funders had no role in study design, data collection and analysis, decision to publish, or preparation of the manuscript.

Competing Interests: The authors have declared that no competing interests exist.

Citation: Jeong Y, Xie Y, Xiao G, Behrens C, Girard L, et al. (2010) Nuclear Receptor Expression Defines a Set of Prognostic Biomarkers for Lung Cancer. PLoS Med 7(12): e1000378. doi:10.1371/journal.pmed.1000378

IN YOUR COVERAGE PLEASE USE THIS URL TO PROVIDE ACCESS TO THE FREELY AVAILABLE PAPER:

http://www.plosmedicine.org/article/info%3Adoi%2F10.1371%2Fjournal.pmed.1000378

PRESS-ONLY PREVIEW OF THE ARTICLE: www.plos.org/press/plme-07-12-manglesdorf.pdf

CONTACT: David Manglesdorf
University. of Texas Southwestern Medical Center
Department of Pharmacology,
Dallas, TX 75390-9050
United States of America
+1 214 645-5967
+1 214 645-5969 (fax)
davo.mango@utsouthwestern.edu

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