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Health News on Hematopathologist for Most Accurate Cancer Testing Results Today

January 10, 2011

Dr. Zsuzsanna Vegh-Goyarts, assistant director of the Flow Cytometry department at Acupath Laboratories, a leading anatomic pathology and cancer genetics laboratory, “For average Americans, the news that a blood disorder or cancer is suspected brings to mind many fears and concerns, but also questions. Among those questions are how is the diagnosis reached, how one’s blood, bone marrow and other specimens are tested and by whom. It is important that your doctor sends samples to an experienced hematopathologist within an established and accredited diagnostics laboratory in order to receive the most accurate results, and ultimately allowing for the best patient care.”

Plainview, NY (PRWEB) January 8, 2011

With the recent leukemia deaths of actresses Jill Clayburgh, 66, and 11-year-old Shannon Tavarez, who appeared in The Lion King on Broadway, leukemia and other blood diseases have reached the forefront of health related news. In fact, according to the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, diseases of the blood afflict hundreds of thousands of people in the United States every year.

The society reports that nearly 260,000 people in the United States are living with, or are in remission from, leukemia, or cancer of the blood or bone marrow, and an estimated 43,050 new cases will be diagnosed this year. For lymphoma, the numbers are even higher, with almost 630,000 people living with or in remission from this lymphoid system blood cancer. Other blood diseases and cancers such as myeloma affect thousands of Americans, as well.

For average Americans, the news that a blood disorder or cancer is suspected brings to mind many fears and concerns, but also questions, says Dr. Zsuzsanna Vegh-Goyarts, assistant director of the Flow Cytometry department at Acupath Laboratories, a leading anatomic pathology and cancer genetics laboratory (http://www.acupath.com) Among those questions are how is the diagnosis reached, how one’s blood, bone marrow and other specimens are tested and by whom. “Just as it is crucial in health matters to have a physician you can trust, it is also important to know that the laboratory and doctor who tests your specimens are experts in the field,” adds Dr. Vegh-Goyarts.

Dr. Vegh-Goyarts explains that a hematopathologist, or blood pathology expert, works closely with the patient’s physician to diagnose blood disorders. “Think of a hematopathologist and a physician as a two-person team,” Dr. Vegh-Goyarts says. “It is important that your doctor sends samples to an experienced hematopathologist within an established and accredited diagnostics laboratory in order to receive the most accurate results, and ultimately allowing for the best patient care. On the other hand the hematologist relies on the clinical data from the patient’s physician to establish a diagnosis. Laboratory data are always viewed in the light of all the clinical background and all test results. Physician and hematopathologist often discuss the case before the final conclusion is reached regarding the diagnosis.”

A hematopathologist is board certified in both anatomic and clinical hematopathology, has additional years of training in the study of diseases of the blood and bone marrow, as well as of the lymphoid organs and tissues such as the lymph nodes, spleen or thymus.

There are some key questions to ask when receiving the news that your blood or other sample must be tested by a hematopathologist:

Who will evaluate my specimen? Can I speak to him or her? Generally, unlike a clinical physician, a pathologist or hematopathologist will have no direct patient contact. “Your doctor will send your samples, along with your clinical history, to a laboratory to process and test. Accredited clinical laboratories have a hematopathologist who will examine the test results and slides,” Dr. Vegh-Goyarts says, adding that the results will be provided to the doctor, who will review it with the patient.

What happens to my specimen when it reaches the lab? Specimens, bone marrow, blood, tissues or biopsy are delivered to a diagnostic laboratory immediately after collection. There, they are processed, tested, measured and analyzed by licensed clinical laboratory technologists and results are carefully examined by the hematopathologist, who then renders a report and a diagnosis based on all test results as well as the patient’s clinical history. A final diagnostic report is issued to the patient’s physician, who will determine the necessary treatment.

What is a biopsy? What kinds of tests may be done? A biopsy is the removal of some cells, tissues or fluid from the body. After collection, the specimens are sent to a pathology laboratory for testing. The most frequent tests done by a hematology laboratory from blood is a complete blood count (CBC): white and red blood cell count, platelet count, hematocrit, red blood cell volume, hemoglobin concentration and differential blood count. Abnormal CBC results may need to be further investigated by additional testing of the blood, bone marrow or biopsy specimens. The additional hematology-oncology testing may include flow cytometry with various antibody panels, cytogenetics for chromosome analysis, fluorescence in-situ hybridization (FISH) and other molecular testing. Biopsies are processed to prepare slides for histology or immunohistochemistry (IHC) studies and/or molecular studies.

What is learned from these tests? Blood, bone marrow and tissue analysis can diagnose many disorders and diseases including hematological malignancies, such as leukemias, lymphomas or myeloma.

How quickly will I receive my test results? Generally, diagnostic results are issued to the appropriate physician within 24 hours. Some specialty tests may take several days. It is then your healthcare provider’s responsibility to contact you immediately.

Acupath Laboratories, Inc. located in Plainview, New York, is an anatomic pathology and cancer genetics laboratory. Acupath’s mission is to deliver fast, accurate anatomic pathology, flow cytometry, molecular and cytogenetic analysis in a way that enhances the quality of medical care provided by practitioners while minimizing the risk of error. The research and development team continuously innovates, designing up to date methodologies for testing and new ways for doctors to access, exchange, record and analyze medical information. Acupath is committed to improve efficiencies of practice, superior service and greater patient knowledge and satisfaction. Acupath is accredited by the College of American Pathologists (CAP), the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA), the Joint Commission, and certified by the New York State Department of Health (DOH). http://www.acupath.com.

About Zsuzsanna Vegh-Goyarts, PhD, With ample experience in the field of tumor biology and immunology, Dr. Zsuzsanna Vegh-Goyarts serves as the assistant director of the Flow Cytometry department and as a member of the research and development team. Prior to Acupath, she worked as an assistant professor in immunology research at the State University of New York (SUNY) at Stony Brook and served as a consulting assistant director of flow cytometry at Enzo Clinical Laboratories, Inc. She spent her postdoctoral years in prestigious research institutes, including the Immunology Department of Albert Einstein College of Medicine, NY and Tumor Biology Department of the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm, Sweden. Dr. Vegh-Goyarts’ research has appeared in an extensive list of peer reviewed publications in various scientific journals, including Cancer Research, Cancer Immunology and Immunotherapy, Molecular Immunology and Cellular Immunology. In addition, she currently holds a Certificate of Qualification in Oncology-Sera and Soluble Tumor Markers, Diagnostic Immunology and all four areas of Cellular Immunology from the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH). Dr. Vegh-Goyarts received her Ph.D. in Medical Science and Immunology in Budapest, Hungary.

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For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2011/01/prweb4948804.htm


Source: prweb



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