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Bath Salts: For Bathing or the Latest High? Willingway Hospital Warns Legally-Purchased Product Can Be Fake Cocaine

January 18, 2011

Fake cocaine and fake meth laced in bath salts, the newest boutique chemical substance, is being sold legally on the internet and in convenience stores, gas stations, truck stops and head shops in most states. Willingway Hospital, a drug and alcohol treatment hospital, advises that It is being used for a narcotic effect and often sends users to emergency rooms.

Statesboro, GA (PRWEB) January 17, 2011 “”

Some bath salts ““ with names like Ocean Burst and Ivory Wave ““ aren’t really for bathing. Rather, they are the latest high for naïve teens and young adults as well as established drug abusers.

“Fake cocaine and fake meth are laced in bath salts and sold legally on the Internet and in convenience stores, gas stations, truck stops and head shops in most states. This newest boutique chemical substance is being used for a narcotic effect and often sends users to emergency rooms,” warns Greg L. Jones, MD, addiction medicine physician at Willingway Hospital, an alcohol and drug abuse treatment center in Statesboro, Ga.

According to Dr. Jones, manufacturers are using engineered molecules similar to controlled substances in the fake bath salts, which are labeled “Ëœnot for consumption,’ to skirt the law. The molecules are derivatives of two controlled substances ““MDPV (methylenedioxypyrovalerone, which is similar to Ritalin, but more potent) and mephedrone (an amphetamine-like drug). Also known as party salts and party powders, fake bath salts are snorted or ingested to create a stimulant, narcotic effect like that of cocaine.

“Users are snorting and ingesting the fake bath salts as a stimulant, to create a sense of euphoria and to stay up and party longer,” Dr. Jones explains. “However, it can increase pulse and blood pressure to dangerous levels and cause delirium and confusion.”

People using the bath salts as a narcotic have been treated for paranoia, hallucinations, agitation, hypertension, chest pain and headaches.

“Drug-naïve teens and college students are showing up in ERs across the country because they purchased and used these products. They probably think that since they didn’t buy them from a drug-dealer that they aren’t as dangerous as the real thing, so they load up on them and reach a toxic state,” Dr. Jones said.

As attention is being drawn to this latest drug abuse fad, Dr. Jones predicts that, as Willingway Hospital is now doing, facilities will be adding questions about use of party powders and fake bath salts to their drug and alcohol history questionnaires. And, more prevalent use is leading to a ban of these products, such as in Louisiana where two weeks ago, Governor Bobby Jindal announced that the so-called bath salts are now defined as illegal narcotics under State of Louisiana law.

About Willingway Hospital

Willingway Hospital is a privately owned, 40-bed hospital specializing in the treatment of alcoholism and drug addiction. Founded in 1971 by the late John Mooney, Jr., M.D. and his wife, the late Dot Mooney, the hospital is recognized as one of the first treatment facilities in the United States. It is located in Statesboro, Ga., on a serene and wooded 11-acre campus. Willingway offers a full range of services including assessments, medical detoxification, inpatient/residential, intensive outpatient, family counseling, extended treatment for men and women and continuing care. For more information, visit http://www.willingway.com.

MEDIA CONTACT: Juliann Kaiser or Jan Sisko, Kaiser Marketing Group, 770 643-0615

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For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2011/01/prweb4975064.htm


Source: prweb