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Is Romance Dying More Quickly?

March 9, 2011

Researchers have found that romance begins to fall flat after 36-months into a relationship, where couples begin to take each other for granted, argue ever more and lose their sexual appetite.

The oft-quoted “Ëœseven-year itch’ has become a “Ëœthree-year glitch’ because of the pressures of modern life, Reuters is reporting.

Couples admitted that they enjoy a third as much sex than newer couples and 55 percent told researchers that they have to schedule time together for romance.

The survey of 2,000 British adults in steady relationships pinpointed the 36-month mark as the time when relationship stress levels peak and points to a new trend of “pink passes” and “solo” holidays away from partners and spouses that many Britons resort to in order to keep romance alive.

Pollster Judi James explains “Longer working hours combined with money worries are clearly taking their toll on modern relationships and we are seeing an increasing trend for solo holidays and weekends away from marriages and relationships in order to revive the romantic spark.”

Findings showed that small irritations, which appeared endearing in the early days of the romance, had become irritating to 67 percent of all of those surveyed and expand into major irritations around the 36-months mark.

Fifty-two percent of the Brits surveyed, who were in younger relationships, said they enjoyed sexual relations at least three times a week, compared to 16 percent of those in relationships older than three years. This suggests that as we get older together, romance gives way to day to day practicalities.

The ever-faster pace of modern life, including longer working hours and financial worries all take a heavy toll on relationships, researchers discovered.

The survey of 2,000 adults in steady relationships suggests that couples are spending less and less time together. On average, a couple spends just 13.9 hours a week in each other’s company and as their romance starts to lose its sparkle around the three-year mark, couples are apart for even longer.

Primary factors cited as snuffing out the romantic sparks include a partner’s weight gain, lack of money, anti-social working hours, lapses in hygiene, taking too much time with the in-laws. A lack of sex or romantic gestures and treats in a relationship are cause for complaint for 8 percent and a partner drinking too much alcohol was cited by 7 percent.

Snoring and other anti-social bedtime habits irritate 6 percent while the wearing of unfashionable clothes and underwear annoys 4 percent.

James tells the Daily Mail that communication between couples is the key to overcoming potential passion killers. “Longer working hours combined with money worries are clearly taking their toll on modern relationships and we are seeing an increasing trend for solo holidays and weekends away from marriages and relationships in order to revive the romantic spark.”

“Often something that may appear trivial such as snoring can become a major relationship stress point. But if you can get past these niggles and communicate openly then there is no reason why a relationship should not go the distance.”

The study was commissioned by Warner Brothers to promote the release of comedy film “Hall Pass” in UK cinemas, reports Reuters.




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