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Data Evaluates Rehospitalization And Cost Burden Of AFib/Atrial Flutter

May 4, 2011

Lead investigator available at HeartRhythm 2011 to discuss data that underscore the growing impact of AFib on US health care costs and resources

Two studies to be presented this week address the often-overlooked costs associated with atrial fibrillation (AFib), the most common form of cardiac arrhythmia. Each study evaluates these costs and updates a growing body of evidence suggesting that the true costs of AFib are complex and may not yet be fully understood. The patient populations studied mimic those in the landmark ATHENA trial, a placebo-controlled, double-blind, parallel arm trial to assess the safety and efficacy of dronedarone 400 mg bid for the prevention of cardiovascular hospitalization or death from any cause in patients with atrial fibrillation/atrial flutter.

Dronedarone is an antiarrhythmic drug indicated to reduce the risk of cardiovascular hospitalization in patients with paroxysmal or persistent atrial fibrillation (AFib) or atrial flutter (AFL), with a recent episode of AFib/AFL and associated cardiovascular risk factors (i.e., age >70, hypertension, diabetes, prior cerebrovascular accident, left atrial diameter â“°¥50 mm or left ventricular ejection fraction [LVEF] <40%), who are in sinus rhythm or who will be cardioverted.

Editorial support for development of this poster was funded by sanofi-aventis U.S. Inc.

Lead investigator, Alpesh N. Amin, MD, University of California, Irvine, is available to discuss key findings following each session.

WHERE: HeartRhythm 2011
San Francisco, CA or via Teleconference

WHEN: Thursday, May 5th, 9:00 AM PT
“Cost Burden to U.S. Payors of ATHENA-Like Patients with Atrial Fibrillation/Atrial Flutter” (poster presentation 11-A-5161-HRS)

Thursday, May 5th, 2:00 PM PT
“Rehospitalization Rates and Costs in Hospitalized ATHENA-Like U.S. Patients with Atrial Fibrillation/Atrial Flutter” (oral presentation 11-A-5148-HRS)

Atrial Fibrillation is the most common form of cardiac arrhythmia. It is associated with an increased risk for stroke , heart failure and death and its prevalence is expected to rise as the population ages In fact, as a growing population of Americans begins to reach their Medicare years, AFib ““ which disproportionately affects those over the age of 65 ““ has the potential to be a largely unrecognized cost-driver.

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