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Health News Archive - November 22, 2005

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Older women who undergo pelvic radiation to treat cervical, anal or rectal cancer have an increased risk of pelvic fracture, new study results indicate.

Published in the latest issue of Family Process, the study confirms that among the newest immigrants, transnationalism is replacing the "melting pot" dynamic of the United States. The study, conducted by a third-generation American Fordham University professor, whose grandparents came from Sicily, and three "transnational" undergraduate students whose parents came, respectively, from Cuba, Greece and Russia, describes how family stories told by new immigrants and their American-born children help retain affiliation with a country other than the United State, reinforcing this dual identity.

A new study by researchers at Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center and colleagues shows that a drug originally used to treat breast cancer may help combat the severe weight loss that can plague patients undergoing radiation treatment for lung and head and neck cancer.

In an important new study from the forthcoming Quarterly Review of Biology, biologists from Binghamton University explore the evolution of two distinct types of laughter – laughter which is stimulus-driven and laughter which is self-generated and strategic.

Studies involving people who suffer from chronic pain often give some of them placebos, "sugar pills" with no medicinal value, to show whether the treatment has real value. Little is known, however, about the types of people who tend to respond positively to placebos, a mystery that places a hurdle before researchers who want to learn the best way to treat people's pain.

Survey results released today by the American College of Preventive Medicine (ACPM) found that nearly half (48%) of U.S. adults 40+ with diabetes are not utilizing aspirin therapy to reduce their risk of recurrent heart attack or stroke nor had they reported discussing such therapy with their healthcare provider.

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Preventing the so-called freshman 15 -- the typical number of pounds students gain during their first year of college -- could be as simple as stepping on a scale every morning or getting a little information about big portions in all-you-can-eat dining halls, according to two new studies from Cornell University.

Stem cells may cause some forms of bone cancer, University of Florida scientists report.

Some 1 million adult New Yorkers are obese, but nearly two-thirds of them don't think they are, according to a study released on Tuesday by the city's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

NEW YORK (Reuters) - Who you calling fat? Some 1 million adult New Yorkers are obese, but nearly two-thirds of them don't think they are, according to a study released on Tuesday by the city's Department of Health and Mental Hygiene.

Word of the Day
saggar
  • A ceramic container used inside a fuel-fired kiln to protect pots from the flame.
The word 'saggar' may come from 'safeguard'.
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