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Last updated on April 24, 2014 at 21:24 EDT

Health News Archive - November 29, 2005

Hundreds of people, most of them children, have contracted pneumonia in Pakistan's earthquake-stricken zone as harsh winter weather sets in, health officials said on Tuesday.

Fatter rear ends are causing many drug injections to miss their mark, requiring longer needles to reach buttock muscle, researchers said on Monday.

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For some people, the body's reaction to stress may raise the odds of developing high cholesterol, the results of a new study suggest.

CHICAGO (Reuters) - Axonyx Inc. said on Tuesday a small group of patients who received a higher dose of an experimental Alzheimer's drug showed significant benefit in two late-stage trials, even though the overall trials failed.

By Amy Norton NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - For some people, the body's reaction to stress may raise the odds of developing high cholesterol, the results of a new study suggest.

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Daily on-the-job exposure to the pesticide diazinon appears to increase the risk of lung cancer and possibly other cancers, according to new findings from the US government-sponsored Agricultural Health Study, a project begun in 1993 to investigate the health effects of pesticides on farm families in Iowa and North Carolina.

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Your heartbeat accelerates, you have butterflies in the stomach, you feel euphoric and a bit silly. It's all part of falling passionately in love -- and scientists now tell us the feeling won't last more than a year.

A large-scale, 12-year study has found that laser ablation with magnetic resonance (MR) guidance is as effective as traditional surgery in the treatment of liver tumors in some patients. The study was presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

A minimally invasive procedure can permanently cure people who suffer from "sweaty hands," according to a study presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).

For the first time, researchers have shown that cat allergens can impair lung function in people with asthma for up to 22 hours after exposure. The study was presented today at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA).