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Health News Archive - December 23, 2005

Forget aspirins, hairs of dogs and hot baths, the only sure way of avoiding a hangover is not to drink in the first place, according to a new study.

Kept awake at night by a snoring partner? The answer to your woes could lie -- believe it or not -- with the Australian didgeridoo.

By Alister Doyle OSLO (Reuters) - Father Christmas may live in Iceland -- at least if the efficiency of his helpers is a guide -- in what may help the island's drive to win hearts and tourism from Arctic rivals claiming Santa and his reindeer.

Riding to new heights of popularity as a health food, the earthy soba noodles are also getting a boost from gourmets, who have set up a course training people to appreciate the finest noodle nuances, much as sommeliers learn about wine.

Customers at Huang Wen-liang's organic restaurant in Taipei fall into three categories: people committed to living healthy, those who fear dying and the curious. Like most organic outlets across east Asia, Huang's business is doing well.

Mildewed walls, spider webs and caverns stacked with bottles blanketed in mold may not add up to most people's idea of Christmas and New Year's Eve festivities.

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Though getting drunk is often seen as a traditional college pastime, other young adults, particularly men, have similarly high rates of potentially hazardous drinking, new research shows.

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If you make it to a ripe old age with all your marbles, credit might go to the gene you inherited.

The age at which girls in the U.S.A. reach puberty is continuing to dip, with heavier weights and changing national demographics playing important roles, according to a new study.

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - The age at which girls in the U.S.A. reach puberty is continuing to dip, with heavier weights and changing national demographics playing important roles, according to a new study.

Word of the Day
monteith
  • A large punch-bowl of the eighteenth century, usually of silver and with a movable rim, and decorated with flutings and a scalloped edge. It was also used for cooling and carrying wine-glasses.
  • A kind of cotton handkerchief having white spots on a colored ground, the spots being produced by a chemical which discharges the color.
This word is possibly named after Monteith (Monteigh), 'an eccentric 17th-century Scotsman who wore a cloak scalloped at the hem.'
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