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Last updated on April 21, 2014 at 12:45 EDT

Health News Archive - December 30, 2005

By Susan Heavey WASHINGTON (Reuters) - Pregnant women coached through their first delivery do not fare much better than those who just do what feels natural, according to a study released on Friday.

By Erik Kirschbaum BERLIN (Reuters) - Germans are leaving their country in record numbers but unlike previous waves of migrants who fled 19th century poverty or 1930s Nazi terror, these modern day refugees are trying to escape a new scourge -- unemployment.

Around 46 million U.S. residents don't have health insurance; a small number regularly show up at a mobile clinic at Deerfield Elementary School outside Washington, D.C., every Monday morning.

While Legionnaire's disease occurs with marked summertime seasonality, epidemiologists have discovered that it's wet, humid weather, rather than increased temperature, that best predicts the acute occurrence of the disease.

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - While daytime blood pressure (BP) tends to be lower during the hot days of summer than during cold weather, elderly patients treated with antihypertensive drugs have higher BP at night when weather is hot, a study shows.

High levels of sugar in the blood, also known as hyperglycemia, is a common finding in individuals taking atypical antipsychotics who are thought to have normal blood sugar levels.

Symptoms of itchy, tearing eyes and nasal congestion due to seasonal allergies interfere with individuals' ability to enjoy sex, results of a study conducted in Turkey suggest. However, successful treatment with an antihistamine can help.

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - For adults with early, aggressive rheumatoid arthritis (RA), treatment with a combination of Humira (adalimumab) and methotrexate appears to be more effective than treatment with either agent alone, according to results of the PREMIER study.

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Even a few counseling sessions on sex after prostate cancer can help improve a couple's sex life, at least in the short term, research hints.

The damage to "ovarian reserve" is quantitative rather than qualitative when ovarian cysts are excised using minimally invasive laparoscopy, Italian researchers report. Importantly, they say, this approach has a good chance of preserving a woman's fertility.