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Health News Archive - July 27, 2005

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On July 30, 1965, Lyndon Johnson was still savoring his landslide election as president, and he drew upon that broad support to sign an ambitious public health-care plan called Medicare into law. Now, 40 years later, most experts -- and Medicare beneficiaries -- agree the program has succeeded in meeting its goals.

By Ed Harris SENAFE, Eritrea (Reuters) - Before the war with Ethiopia, buses and trucks rumbled through Eritrea's border town of Senafe, shuttling daily between Asmara and Addis Ababa on a thriving trade route.

By Terry Friel TIMAI REFUGEE CAMP, Nepal (Reuters) - In the dark silence of a bamboo and thatch hut in eastern Nepal an old woman is dying. Skeleton thin, mouth puffed open with cancer and eyes no longer seeing, she sits cross-legged, cradled by the bare muscled arms of a young grandson.

By Tomi Soetjipto JAKARTA (Reuters) - When an Indonesian reality TV show was announced featuring baby-faced actor Ari Wibowo's search for a maid, thousands were suddenly jostling for a job that normally means low pay, endless hours and sometimes abuse.

By Pascal Fletcher CUBAGUA, Venezuela (Reuters) - Those who fear the world's economy will crash the day the Earth's oil reserves run dry can cite the "pearl island" of Cubagua as a lesson in how not to exploit a natural resource.

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Twins conceived by test tube or "in vitro fertilization" (IVF) are more likely than twins conceived through sexual intercourse to be born prematurely and to be delivered by c-section, a review of previous studies suggests.

By Amy Norton NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Women who use over-the-counter progesterone creams could be exposed to hormone levels comparable to those used in a form of hormone replacement therapy, a small study suggests.

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Scientists have identified genes enabling breast cancer cells to spread to the lungs, a discovery that could improve diagnosis and treatment of the disease.

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A smart anti-cancer bomb that acts like a Trojan horse can penetrate deep into tumors where it explodes and destroys cancerous cells without harming healthy ones, scientists said Wednesday.

By Patricia Reaney LONDON (Reuters) - A smart anti-cancer bomb that acts like a Trojan horse can penetrate deep into tumors where it explodes and destroys cancerous cells without harming healthy ones, scientists said Wednesday.

Word of the Day
abrosia
  • Wasting away as a result of abstinence from food.
The word 'abrosia' comes from a Greek roots meaning 'not' and 'eating'.