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Health News Archive - March 24, 2006

By Anne Harding NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Young men who feel good about their looks are more likely than their peers with a less positive body image to engage in risky sexual behavior, a new study of college students shows.

Research and Markets (http://www.researchandmarkets.com/reports/c34773) has announced the addition of Outpatient Surgical Centers - Industry Profile to their offering.

SIOUX FALLS, South Dakota (Reuters) - Abortion-rights supporters launched an attack on Friday on a new South Dakota law designed as a direct challenge to the U.S. Supreme Court decision that legalized abortion 33 years ago.

German scientists said on Friday they had isolated sperm-producing stem cells that have similar properties to embryonic stem cells from adult mice.

SIOUX FALLS, South Dakota (Reuters) - Abortion-rights supporters launched a referendum drive on Friday to overturn a new South Dakota abortion ban passed as a challenge to the 1973 U.S. Supreme Court decision that legalized the practice.

Studies have suggested that aspirin is less effective for preventing heart attack in women than in men, although women do benefit from a similar reduction in risk of stroke due to a blocked artery.

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Provider recommendations play an important role in pneumonia and influenza vaccination of older Americans, according to a survey of 4577 Medicare beneficiaries.

NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Artists beware. In the journal Neurology this month, doctors report a case of reflex epilepsy triggered by the experience of drawing.

By Will Bogs, MD NEW YORK (Reuters Health) - Levels of HDL cholesterol -- the good cholesterol -- can be used to predict major adverse coronary events, independent of other heart and circulatory risk factors, according to a report published this month.

Results of a study suggest that schizophrenia may be associated with a larger range of autoimmune diseases than previously suspected.

Word of the Day
omadhaun
  • A fool; a simpleton: a term of abuse common in Ireland and to a less extent in the Gaelic-speaking parts of Scotland.
This word is partly Irish in origin.