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Health News Archive - April 18, 2009

The New York City health department is warning residents about the dangers of receiving body-enhancement injections of castor oil and other substances. Dr.

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According to US researchers, the medical phenomenon known as the “silent” heart attacks is likely far more prevalent – and dangerous – than experts had previously suspected.

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Soldiers already suffering from relatively weak physical or mental health are at a greater risk for developing post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) after returning home.

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New research suggests that older adults who worry about their health often opt out of physical activity, resulting in greater trouble walking and getting around as they age.

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Female athletes are more prone to suffer knee injuries than men, and researchers at the University of Calgary may have discovered why.

WASHINGTON and DENVER, April 18 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- "Getting closer to controlling cancer" requires funding more laboratories and a commitment beyond the two years of the new federal stimulus, say former White House Drug Policy spokesman Robert Weiner and a George Washington University Medical Center breast cancer laboratory director, Dr.

Word of the Day
cock-a-hoop
  • Exultant; jubilant; triumphant; on the high horse.
  • Tipsy; slightly intoxicated.
This word may come from the phrase 'to set cock on hoop,' or 'to drink festively.' Its origin otherwise is unclear. A theory, according to the Word Detective, is that it's a 'transliteration of the French phrase 'coq a huppe,' meaning a rooster displaying its crest ('huppe') in a pose of proud defiance.' Therefore, 'cock-a-hoop' would 'liken a drunken man to a boastful and aggressive rooster.'
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