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Health News Archive - November 24, 2011

The Dangers Of Snow Shoveling

Urban legend warns shoveling snow causes heart attacks, and the legend seems all too accurate, especially for male wintery excavators with a family history of premature cardiovascular disease.

Norwich is one of only four four-year institutions in the US to hold Center of Excellence designations in Digital Forensics and Information Assurance. NORTHFIELD,

Dreaming Helps Take The Sting Out Of Painful Memories

UC Berkeley researchers have found that stress chemicals shut down and the brain processes emotional experiences during the REM dream phase of sleep.

Orthodontic Problems Linked To Food Gathering

A new study has found that many of the orthodontic problems faced by people in industrialized nations are due to their soft modern diet.

Researchers Help Fight Ineffective Antipsychotic Drugs

Researchers interested in the treatment of schizophrenia and dementia have helped clarify how antipsychotic drugs that target a complex of two receptors at the surface of cells in the brain work.

Even Slight Overdose Of Tylenol Can Be Lethal: Study

Taking even just a little too much of the pain reliever acetaminophen, the main ingredient in Tylenol, over time is more likely to be fatal than taking a single, massive overdose, British researchers warned on Tuesday.

Substance In Cancer Medicine May Help Prevent Heart Attacks

Researchers at the Sahlgrenska Academy at the University of Gothenburg, Sweden have been using a substance found in cancer and epilepsy drugs to help stimulate the body’s natural defense mechanism against blood clots.

Amid Reports Of Stocks Suffering For Six Straight Days, USAPaydayForever.com Announces Easier Requirements For Those With Bad Credit, Personal Loans Are Now Within Reach.

Jean Todt, the President of FIA, arrived in Estonia for his two-day visit on the 17th of November.

Word of the Day
swell-mobsman
  • A member of the swell-mob; a genteelly clad pickpocket. Sometimes mobsman.
Use of the word 'swell-mobsman' dates at least to the early 1800s.