Quantcast

Oddities News Archive - February 03, 2004

By AUDRA ANG DALIAN, China (AP) -- Hidden in a maze of factories in the heart of this northeastern Chinese port city is the house Gunther von Hagens built - and, for many, a place where nightmares are created.Inside von Hagens' sprawling, well-guarded compound, behind a leaning metal fence pocked with holes, are more than 800 human beings - 200 of his staffers and 645 dead bodies in steel cases from almost a dozen nations.The anatomist, whose exhibits of preserved human corpses have riled religious leaders in Europe and attracted the curious and the outraged across the world, set up shop here three years ago to process bodies for his shows.Last month, media reports from von Hagens' native Germany asserted that at least two of the corpses, both Chinese, had bullet holes in their skulls - the method China uses for execution.

Word of the Day
baudekin
  • A rich embroidered or brocaded silk fabric woven originally with a warp of gold thread.
'Baudekin' seems to be an alternative form of 'baldachin,' from the Italian 'Baldacco,' Baghdad, the city where the material was made.
Related