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Oddities News Archive - January 27, 2009

Though many quirky offices exist in the U.S.

A New Zealand man said he discovered personal information on U.S.

Swedish authorities have barred a woman's attempt to obtain a license plate bearing the letters ADHD, describing the combination as potentially offensive. The 29-year-old Sodertalje woman was blocked from obtaining a plate reading ADHD after Swedish Transport Agency officials ruled the letters ADHD, an abbreviation for Attention-Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder, are inappropriate for a license plate and potentially offensive, The Local reported Tuesday. Swedish Transport Agency representative Mikael Andersson said officials use three criteria when considering potential license plates: Firstly, it can't be similar to regular registration numbers, secondly if it is a registered trademark then permission needs to be granted and proved, and thirdly it must not be offensive, he said. Andersson said the provision governing offensiveness is the most difficult to enforce and is decided on an individual basis. Everything changes in society and this is the same for words and phrases that could be

Sanitation officials in Beijing said workers picked up 2,268 tons of fireworks debris following the arrival of the Chinese Lunar New Year. Beijing Municipal Administration Commission officials said more than 10,000 sanitation workers were deployed Sunday night and Monday morning to collect spent casings from fireworks fired off in the streets to greet the New Year, Xinhua, China's state-run news agency, reported Tuesday. Beijingers have apparently lit up more fireworks this year -- the debris we collected was 168 tons more than last year, said Zhang Zhiqiang, operation manager of Beijing Environment Sanitation Engineering Group Co.

A pair of geese have become a bone of contention between bird-lovers and other residents of an Atlanta condominium complex. The pair, Bertie and Bowie, have lived at the pond at the Cross Creek condos in the Buckhead neighborhood for 15 years, the Atlanta Journal-Constitution reports.

Police in Wisconsin said they have arrested a man whose alleged attempted restaurant robbery was foiled by a chef armed with a large metal spoon. Investigators alleged Joey Geraci, 39, entered the Williams Supper Club in Waukesha at about 10 p.m.

A British survey has named the Monty Python tune Always Look on the Bright Side of Life as the country's top alternative funeral song. The survey of 764 people, commissioned by the Children's Society, found the song from Monty Python's Life of Brian was the top choice among respondents, with one fifth of those polled saying they would like the ditty played at their funerals, The Daily Telegraph reported Tuesday. The No.

Two institutions of higher education, one in Illinois and one in Pennsylvania, have settled a legal battle over rights to the name Robert Morris University. Under the agreement, the former Robert Morris College in Chicago can call itself Robert Morris University Illinois, the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette reported. Both universities were named after Robert Morris, a Philadelphia merchant nicknamed Financier of the Revolution, because he used much of his great personal fortune to keep the colonial forces going.

Police said $130,120 cash discovered inside of an abandoned tire by Indiana Department of Transportation workers was likely drug money. The Indiana State Police said the money was discovered by the highway workers Friday while they were picking up litter along I-70 in Hancock County, the Indianapolis Star reported Tuesday. The workers called the state police, who said the cash was rolled up in rubber bands, a common practice among drug couriers.

CVS stores in the Minneapolis-St. Paul area complain that they lost $40,000 to a loyal shoplifter who specialized in detergent, body wash and deodorant. Randy Sterling, 43, of St. Paul has been charged with thefts earlier this month, the St. Paul Pioneer Press reported.

Word of the Day
mallemaroking
  • Nautical, the visiting and carousing of sailors in the Greenland ships.
This word is apparently from a confusion of two similar Dutch words: 'mallemerok,' a foolish woman, and 'mallemok,' a name for some persons among the crew of a whaling vessel.