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Oddities News Archive - March 15, 2009

Nine Swedish police officers have been placed on desk duty while investigators look into allegations they posed unclothed for pictures at a party. There are new claims that the men made a habit of stripping, the Goteborgs-Posten reports.

A 9-year-old boy was temporarily trapped in a gun safe inside a suburban Chicago store by his brother, officials said. Officials in Hoffman Estates, Ill., told the Arlington Heights (Ill.) Daily Herald the boy was stuck in the safe for nearly 20 minutes while firefighters sought a way to open the locked box. The boy apparently was locked inside the safe at Cabela's recreation goods store after his brother forced him into it and spun the locking mechanism once the door was closed. Fire Lt.

Two wildlife lovers in Britain say they watched a bunch of squirrels enjoy a meal of potato chips flavored like squirrel stew. Nigel and Camilla Cullum of the British county of Buckinghamshire said they saw squirrels eagerly consume a bag of Cajun Squirrel chips that they placed on their bird feeder, The Sun reported Friday. The flavored chips from the Walkers snack food manufacturer were inspired by the Brunswick stew that is served in British restaurants and in U.S.

An official with Britain's Labor Party insulted those with Scottish accents by asking for a translation of a Glasgow man's comments, a union official says. Collins had interjected in a question-and-answer session with Labor deputy leader Harriet Harman to request a translation of the man's comments, the Daily Mail reported Sunday. I heard Mr.

A company in Britain says it will offer consumers their choice of liquid egg products from either free-range or cage-grown chickens. Oaklands Farm Eggs will officially unveil Cartons of Egg in an Instant at the upcoming International Food and Drink Event in London, The Daily Telegraph reported Saturday. Oaklands

Washington will soon enjoy street car services for the first time in 45 years as part of a $25 million project, officials say. John Lisle, public information officer for the District of Columbia Department of Transportation, said the two-mile project is the first part of a streetcar initiative that will include the construction of a new maintenance facility and tracks, The Washington Times reported Sunday. On those tracks will be three street cars that have been in storage since being purchased for $10 million in 2005. District Council Member Jim Graham, who previously opposed an attempt to bring streetcars back to Washington, is now fully in support of the new project. Now there's been a reorientation, so it's serving the people of the District of Columbia and the route has a prospect now, the Democrat said. The Times said the project is expected to be completed within 18 months.

An insurance agent in Hudson, Ohio, says he received a postcard from someone he did not know and was dated 1962. Insurance agent Dave Conn said he was confused by the postcard signed by someone named Fran that appeared in his post office box recently, the Akron (Ohio) Beacon Journal reported Thursday. After doing some digging, Conn said he connected the postcard to the late Beacon Journal reporter Frances B.

A Russian national serving a 40-year prison sentence in a Minnesota prison has had his petition to be transferred to a Russian facility denied, officials said. Pytor Shmelev was convicted of murdering his wife in 2001.

A Vermont hunter is paying the price for trying to pass off a doe as a buck by attaching antlers to the dead animal's head, authorities say. Marcel Fournier, 19, of Concord was hit with a $400 fine and a 10-day jail sentence Feb.

The Australian telecommunications group Telstra says customers must pay extra if they want to speak with one of its Australian employees. An unidentified Telstra spokesman said the company has created a new messaging service that allows customers to avoid speaking with overseas workers for a negotiated

Word of the Day
barratry
  • The offense of persistently instigating lawsuits, typically groundless ones.
  • An unlawful breach of duty on the part of a ship's master or crew resulting in injury to the ship's owner.
  • Sale or purchase of positions in church or state.
This word ultimately comes from the Old French word 'barater,' to cheat.
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