Quantcast

Oddities News Archive - April 02, 2009

The British builders of a steam-powered car say they are targeting 127.7 mph, the speed record for steam-power set in 1906. The team said the car, nicknamed the world's fastest kettle, made it up to 80 mph Wednesday during a test run on a Ministry of Defense runway at the Thorney Island airfield in West Sussex, England, The Times of London reported Thursday. Don Wales, 48, who drove the car during the test run, said all appears on track for the record attempt in June at the Edwards Air Force Base in California. The car really did handle beautifully.

A children's television star in Sweden was hospitalized after cutting off the tip of his own finger during a live show. The Work Environment Authority said the star, known as a part-time employee of the popular TV show Bobster, was working on a show called Breath Competition at the Sveriges Television studio in Malmo when he cut off the nail and part of the pad of his middle finger while slicing potatoes, The Local reported Thursday. The program aired Feb.

Doctors at a Colorado clinic said a nail coughed up by a patient may have been lodged up the man's nose for 30 years. The Old Colorado City family clinic said patient Prax Sanchez arrived complaining of a sharp pain in his face under his right eye, KKTV, Colorado Springs, Colo., reported Thursday. Doctors and staff at the clinic said they were shocked when, after a magnetic resonance imaging test, Sanchez began coughing and a 1-inch nail fell out of his nose. To us, he's a medical miracle.

A South Side Chicago home that once housed mobster Al Capone and his family is being put on the market with an asking price of $450,000. Patrice Brazil, the Coldwell Banker agent who's listing the Park Manor neighborhood building, said that while the price is higher than the $180,000 to $230,000 that similar houses in the area have been selling for, the home is likely to appeal to those interested in its history, the Chicago Tribune reported Thursday. I'm looking for people who would be interested in the historical value of this home, Brazil said.

Officials with the Cook County Board in Illinois said a discontented audience member at a recent meeting may have left feces behind in the boardroom. The officials said board members smelled the feces during Wednesday's meeting and County Board President Todd Stroger called a half-hour recess while boardroom staff removed the offending substance, the Arlington Heights (Ill.) Daily Herald reported Thursday. Officials said they have not ruled out the idea that the feces may have been dropped by a child, but witnesses said they did not see any children in the area where the waste was discovered.

A New York state TV station said it had to call emergency responders after a stray cat became stuck inside the satellite dish base of a news truck. The WCBS-TV, New York, news crew said they were driving to Nassau County Police headquarters for a news conference when other motorists pointed out that a cat was wedged under the satellite dish, WCBS reported Thursday. When you guys came in to our press conference we thought it was an April Fool's joke, so we didn't take it seriously at first.

Police in West Virginia said a 12-year-old Wood County boy was arrested after he allegedly crashed his mother's car into a police vehicle. West Virginia State Police Sgt. S.E. Wolfe said the boy's mother reported the car stolen from her Mineral Wells home Wednesday at 7:54 a.m.

Andrea Mead Lawrence, winner of two gold medals at the 1952 Winter Olympics, died this week at her home in California. Her daughter, Quentin Lawrence, told The New York Times that Lawrence, 76, suffered from metastatic cancer.

A Wisconsin woman said her GPS navigation unit left her stranded miles into the woods on a snowmobile trail in Langlade County. The woman called 911 at 10:44 a.m.

Word of the Day
toccata
  • In music, a work for a keyboard-instrument, like the pianoforte or organ, originally intended to utilize and display varieties of touch: but the term has been extended so as to include many irregular works, similar to the prelude, the fantasia, and the improvisation.
This word is Italian in origin, coming from the feminine past participle of 'toccare,' to touch.
Related