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New Chili Pepper Resources Published at Olericulture.org

December 4, 2011

The Vegetable Magazine Olericulture.org has newly included 341 resources to its Chili Pepper category. Chili pepper is the fruit of plants from the genus Capsicum, members of the nightshade family, Solanaceae. Chili peppers originated in the Americas and have been a part of the human diet since at least 7,500 BC.

(PRWEB) December 04, 2011

The Vegetable Magazine Olericulture.org has newly included 341 resources to its Chili Pepper category. Chili pepper is the fruit of plants from the genus Capsicum, members of the nightshade family, Solanaceae. Chili peppers originated in the Americas and have been a part of the human diet since at least 7,500 BC.

Olericulture is the science and technology of cultivating and producing vegetables. Within this discipline, the Vegetable Research Magazine Olericulture.org provides a wide range of resources related to traditional temperate and oftentimes indigenous, tropical vegetable crops.

Most of the commercial pungent chili peppers belong to Capsicum frutescens, Solanaceae whereas others are Capsicum annuum and Capsicum chinense. These hot-fleshed peppers contain capsaicinoids. Related commercial varieties include cayenne and tabasco. Olericulture.org’s Chili Pepper category now includes 341 selected resources providing qualified information on this vegetable.

The General Chili Pepper Section within the Vegetables Crops Category of Olericulture.org provides information about the aspects of production of chili pepper including cultivation, pests and diseases, harvest, postharvest, storage and marketing. The category’s most prominent resource is a page on innovative uses of the ancient crop capsicum published by Purdue University’s Center for New Crops and Plants Products. It covers the history, botany, breeding, pungency and pigments of capsicums which is a diverse plant group, ranging from the sweet green bell peppers to the fiery hot peppers. The pungency of the latter species is produced by the capsaicinoids which are alkaloid compounds only found in the plant genus Capsicum. Pungency is expressed in “Scoville Heat Units” which was traditionally been determined by organoleptic tests which have now been replaced with instrumental methods including high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). New Mexico State University maintains the website of the Chile Pepper Institute (CPI) which is a research-based, international nonprofit organization devoted to education, research, and archiving information related to Capsicum.

The Chili Pepper Research Section at Olericulture.org provides scientific information and links to peer-reviewed papers, journal articles, theses, books, abstracts, and other scholarly literature on current and recent research on chili. It contains a number of scientific papers including a report on Starch Fossils and the Domestication and Dispersal of Chili Peppers (Capsicum spp. L.) in the Americas. This report covers a genus-specific starch morphotype that provides a means to identify chili peppers from archaeological contexts and trace both their domestication and dispersal. The section also lists a paper on intracellular localization of capsaicin and its analogues in Capsicum fruit. It identifies the vacuole as the intracellular accumulation site of capsaicinoid in the protoplast of Capsicum fruits. Another paper on “Foraging Behaviour of Wild Bees at Hot Pepper Flowers (Capsicum annuum) and its Possible Influence on Cross Pollination” suggests that small native species of bees effectively pollinate the flowers of hot peppers and that their small foraging areas are important in keeping the cultivars of both hot and sweet peppers genetically distinct where several cultivars are grown close together.

Olericulture.org was launched in 1996 and has emerged as a comprehensive aggregator of websites and science references in the applied life science olericulture. The site is now under new management and has just been republished.

Users who wish to submit their own or their company’s information for inclusion in Olericulture.org are welcome to submit their listing. Furthermore, the site maintains a number of RSS feeds which enables users to subscribe to their most favorite topics within the site. Olericulture.org also maintains the Twitter account @Olericulture which currently features 2,616 tweets and 104 followers.

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For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2011/12/prweb9012105.htm


Source: prweb



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