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EurekaMag.com Publishes New Reviews of Roquefort, Australopithecus and Paleontology

February 21, 2012

The Sciences Magazine EurekaMag.com publishes reviews of specific subjects of all areas of natural science. The latest review covers the Roquefort which is one of the world’s best-known blue cheeses made of sheep milk, Australopithecus which is an extinct genus of humans that evolved in eastern Africa around four million years ago before spreading throughout the continent and becoming extinct two million years ago, and Paleontology which is the study of prehistoric life that includes the study of fossils to determine organisms’ evolution and interactions with each other and their environments.

Mannheim, Germany (PRWEB) February 21, 2012

The Online Natural Sciences Magazine EurekaMag.com publishes reviews of subjects in all areas of natural sciences including biology, agriculture, horticulture, forestry, geography, environment and health. Drawing from this pool of scientific disciplines, it provides articles, reviews and insights on natural sciences topics. While the Online Natural Sciences Research Category contains over 36 million references, most of the reviews are included in the Online Natural Sciences Keyword Category of the online magazine. The latter category now includes three newly published reviews of Roquefort, Australopithecus and Paleontology.

The EurekaMag.com review of Roquefort covers one of the world’s best-known blue cheeses from the south of France made of sheep milk. Although similar cheeses are produced elsewhere, European law regulates that only cheeses aged in the natural Combalou caves of Roquefort-sur-Soulzon may bear the name Roquefort, as it is a recognized geographical indication, or has a protected designation of origin. The EurekaMag.com review covers important fungi growing on Roquefort cheese including Penicillium, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Geotrichum, Mucor and Trichoderma. Incidence of moulds in cheese indicates that the predominant flora belong to the genus Penicillium. Some types of cheese such as Camembert and Roquefort cheese intentionally contain moulds. For the production of these kinds of cheeses, starter fungal cultures that have low toxigenic capacity have been selected. The history of Roquefort cheese is highlighted since this legend is still within living memory of the French people receiving great recognition. Its birth several centuries ago, the brief description of preparation, and development of the more and more large-scale production, past and present of its protection and the consumption habits offer exciting and useful information.

EurekaMag.com presents a review of Australopithecus which is an extinct genus of humans that evolved in eastern Africa around four million years ago before spreading throughout the continent and becoming extinct two million years ago. It is widely believed that the Australopithecus played a significant part in human evolution, and it was an Australopithecus species that evolved into the Homo genus in Africa around two million years ago. The latter genus contained the modern human species Homo sapiens sapiens. The EurekaMag.com review contains a report of isotopic analyses of two species of early hominins from Tanzania: Homo habilis and Australopithecus boisei. The results show that these two species had very different diets. When applied to fossil samples, upper:lower limb-size proportions in Australopithecus afarensis are similar to those of humans and are significantly different from all great ape proportions, while Australopithecus africanus is more similar to the apes and significantly different from humans and Australopithecus afarensis. Whether dental development among living apes or humans provides a better model for comparison with that of Plio-Pleistocene hominids of the genus Australopithecus remains, however, a contentious point.

The EurekaMag.com review of Paleontology covers the study of prehistoric life that includes the study of fossils to determine organisms’ evolution and interactions with each other and their environments. Palaeontology lies on the border between biology and geology. It uses techniques drawn from a wide range of sciences, including biochemistry, mathematics and engineering. While paleontology is the study of the fossil record of past geological periods and of the phylogenetic relationships between ancient and contemporary plant and animal species, geobiology is more integrative. It is the study of the interactions that occur between the biosphere and the geosphere. The EurekaMag.com review approximates the ideas about and knowledge of Paleontology and covers the geological studies of William F. Bucklandon in the region around his birthplace at the head of Lake Ontario. At first he mainly studied Paleozoic geology and paleontology, but by 1880 he had switched decisively to surficial geology, particularly the preglacial drainage of Lakes Erie and Ontario. The review also describes the life and work of Jaroslav Perner, an eminent Czechoslovakian paleontologist and the first professor of paleontology at the Charles University in Prague. He was also the founder of the paleontological section of the geological institute of that university. He had a deep interest in science and the development of his country. He was a naturalist, a connoisseur in ornithology and conchology, who was deeply acquainted with paleontology.

The Science Magazine EurekaMag.com was launched in November 1998 as the online version of the French science magazine “Eurêka – Le magazine des sciences” published since 1995. During the past decade, it has emerged as a comprehensive aggregator of information on biology, on the applied life sciences agriculture, horticulture and forestry, on the earth sciences, on the environmental sciences, and on the health sciences.

The Science Magazine has recently been accredited by the Chinese Ministry of Industry and Information Technology with the Internet Content Provider (ICP) Number 10204677. The site delivers its content through a number of RSS feeds including an EurekaMag.com “Most Shared Content” RSS Feed, an EurekaMag.com “Life Traffic Feed”, and an @EurekaMag Twitter account. The @EurekaMag Twitter account currently features 50,450 tweets and 1,039 followers. The site also provides an EurekaMag.com portal for mobile viewing at m.eurekamag.com. The site accepts advertisements through the Google AdWords system.

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For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2012/2/prweb9211091.htm


Source: prweb



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