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Life, Earth and Health Sciences Magazine Publishes New Insights Into False Widow Spider and Glabella

April 26, 2012

The Life, Earth and Health Sciences Magazine publishes insights into specific subjects of all areas of natural science. The latest review covers False Widow Spider which is named after the behavior of the female of eating the male after mating and Glabella which is the space between the eyebrows and above the nose in humans.

Mannheim, Germany (PRWEB) April 26, 2012

The Life, Earth and Health Sciences Magazine publishes insights into subjects in all areas of natural sciences including biology, agriculture, horticulture, forestry, geography, environment and health. Drawing from this pool of scientific disciplines, it provides articles, reviews and insights on natural sciences topics. While the Life, Earth and Health Sciences Research Category contains over 36 million references, most of the insights are included in the Life, Earth and Health Sciences Keyphrase Category, the Life, Earth and Health Sciences Review Category, and the Life, Earth and Health Sciences Keyword Category of the online magazine. The latter category now includes two newly published insights into False Widow Spider and Glabella.

The Life, Earth and Health Sciences Magazine insight into False Widow Spider covers Latrodectus as a genus of spiders in the family Theridiidae which contains 31 recognized species. The common name widow spiders is applied to members of the genus due to the behavior of the female of eating the male after mating. The Life, Earth and Health Sciences Magazine review shows that Australian spider bite causes minor effects in most cases and is unlikely to cause necrotic ulcers, allergic reactions or infection. Redback spider bite causes prolonged pain, and antivenom could have been used more frequently. Scorpion sting is the most important arachnid envenomation causing adult morbidity and paediatric mortality. Important groups of spiders include the false widow spiders, the recluse spiders, and two spiders confined to single countries: the Australian funnel web spider and the armed spider from Brazil. There are four false widow spider antivenoms available, including the Australian redback spider antivenom and the American black widow antivenom. Despite good in vitro animal work demonstrating effective neutralization with these antivenoms, and cross-reactivity between many species, there continues to be a reluctance to use them in some countries. Toxin-related disease is an important cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide, particularly in the tropical and subtropical continents. Spider bite is far less of a problem, and the majority of medically important cases can be attributed to false widow spiders and recluse spiders. Marine-related envenomations are common, but severe effects are less so.

In humans, the Glabella is the space between the eyebrows and above the nose. It is slightly elevated, and joins the two superciliary ridges. It is the most forward projecting point of the forehead in the midline of the supraorbital ridges and is also called mesophryon. The Life, Earth and Health Sciences Magazine insight into Glabella presents results of studies on Glabella reflex. Abnormal glabella reflex and deficits in verbal memory, attention and complex executive functions seem specifically to be related to schizophrenia-spectrum disorder among children at genetic risk for psychosis, while neurobehavioral deficits in general characterized children at heightened genetic risk for psychosis, with no relation to schizophrenia-spectrum disorders. The authors of this study found that ribidity, stooped posture, graphesthesia, neglect of simultaneous tactile stimuli, and snout, grasp, and glabella reflexes were present significantly more often in patients with AD than in control subjects. The insight also provides information on respiratory insufficiency resulting from prominent Glabella. An infant which died of respiratory insufficiency showed microcephaly of the propositus, prominent glabella, broad bridge of the nose, ocular hypertelorism, poorly differentiated and low-set ears, bilateral palatoschisis, and micrognathia.

The Life, Earth and Health Sciences Magazine was launched in November 1998 as the online version of the French science magazine “Eurêka – Le magazine des sciences” published since 1995. During the past decade, it has emerged as a comprehensive aggregator of information on biology, on the applied life sciences agriculture, horticulture and forestry, on the earth sciences, on the environmental sciences, and on the health sciences.

The site delivers its content through a number of RSS feeds including an EurekaMag.com “Most Shared Content” RSS Feed, an EurekaMag.com “Life Traffic Feed”, and an @EurekaMag Twitter account. The @EurekaMag Twitter account currently features 56,324 tweets and 1,164 followers. The site also provides an EurekaMag.com portal for mobile viewing at m.eurekamag.com. The site accepts advertisements through the Google AdWords system.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2012/4/prweb9440248.htm


Source: prweb



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