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Duncraft Lists Ten Features of a Good Bird House

May 17, 2012

Duncraft offers an impressive selection of bird houses both for specific birds and multi-functional houses that will work for many birds. Although a house may not have every recommended feature and can still be perfectly serviceable, Duncraft offers these tips on the best things to look for when purchasing a bird house.

Concord, NH (PRWEB) May 17, 2012

Duncraft offers an impressive selection of bird houses both for specific birds and multi-functional houses that will work for many birds. Although a house may not have every recommended feature and can still be perfectly serviceable, Duncraft offers these tips on the best things to look for when purchasing a bird house.

1. No perch in front

Tree cavities in the wild have no perches, so birds that use nest boxes don´t need them. Perches can be a disadvantage in that they may attract House Sparrows, an invasive species that often takes over nests from native cavity-nesting birds.

2. Proper entry-hole size

The most common cavity-nesting birds can use an entrance hole between 1 ¼” and 1 ½” in diameter. This size also keeps out European Starlings, another invasive species that take over nest boxes from native species. Having the entry hole reinforced with a guard helps prevent squirrels and raccoons from reaching down into the box.

3. Floor dimensions

The inside dimensions of the box are important and should be at least 4 inches by 4 inches so there is room for the young of more common species to develop. Other birds such as woodpeckers or ducks have more specific needs.

4. Box height

The distance from the bottom of the entrance hole to the floor of the box should be at least 5 inches. This keeps the developing young well down in the box and away from predators that might approach the entry hole.

5. Be Able to Open

The box should open easily, either on the side, front, or top by turning a latch or removing a screw. This helps in two ways–to monitor the progress and health of the young and to clean out the box after the young have fledged and at the end of the season.

6. Ventilation

There must be holes or slits at the top of the box sides or along the top of the front of the box to let hot air out when the sun beats down on the box in summer.

7. Drainage Holes

The bottom of the box needs to have holes or cut off corners to allow any water to drain out of the box.

8. A Way to Attach the Box

Check to see if there is some way that you can attach the box to a pole, such as predrilled holes and screws or a mounting paddle on the back. Some boxes can be bottom-mounted and some can be rear-mounted on appropriate poles with the correct adapters.

9. Proper materials

Be sure that the materials the box is made of are ¾” wood or a similar material that will insulate the birds from cold and heat. Duncraft has been making beautiful, durable houses with recycled plastic. The only exception to wood or plastic is housing for Purple Martins–often these are made of metal.

10. Roof Overhang

The roof should overhang the entrance hole by 1 to 2 inches. This both shades the entrance hole and keeps the rain out.

Other aspects of housing birds once the house is purchased are location, predator control, checking the health of the nestlings and cleaning the box thoroughly after each brood. Duncraft customers have access to complete information on Duncraft´s Wild Bird Blog and Duncraft urges customers to study the subject before putting up nesting boxes. The health and safety of wild birds depends on it!

Founded in 1952 and located in Concord, New Hampshire, Duncraft´s objective is to bring the joy of backyard birding to wild bird lovers all across the country. Mike Dunn, owner and CEO is constantly inventing and searching for innovative ideas in bird feeding–giving bird lovers years of bird feeding enjoyment, success and satisfaction.

Duncraft

102 Fisherville Road

Concord, NH 03303

603-224-0200

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2012/5/prweb9511165.htm


Source: prweb



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