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Jonny Bowden Defends Vitamin D in a Natural Health Sherpa Post

June 26, 2012

Taking more than 800IU of supplemental vitamin D is unnecessary and can be harmful to health the Institute of Medicine´s Food and Nutrition Board´s report. Jonny Bowden, aka “The Rogue Nutritionist” disagrees and publishes his defense of vitamin D in a Natural Health Sherpa article.

Wilmington, NC (PRWEB) June 26, 2012

In an article published by Natural Health Sherpa Jonny Bowden, aka, “The Rogue Nutritionist” publicly disagrees with a report issued by the Institute of Medicine´s Food and Nutrition Board. The report says, in essence, that taking 800 IU of vitamin D is not necessary and could even be harmful.

Jonny Bowden advises readers to simply ignore the report saying that it “lacks any basis in the latest scientific research, and ignores the ´real world´ findings of medical practitioners who routinely prescribe higher doses of vitamin D and see dramatic results in their patients.”

The committee, according to Jonny Bowden, only looked at the amount of vitamin D known to be needed for strong bones. While he agrees that vitamin D is important in strengthening bones, Bowden says that it´s “only one of the many important things this miraculous ℠smart´ nutrient does.”

Jonny Bowden quotes vitamin D expert William Grant, PhD:

“The health benefits of vitamin D extend to at least 100 types of disease, with the strongest evidence for many types of cancer (breast, colon, ovarian, pancreatic, prostate, and rectal), cardiovascular disease, diabetes types 1 and 2, respiratory infections such as type A influenza and pneumonia, other infections such as sepsis, and autoimmune diseases such as multiple sclerosis.”

“I consider vitamin D right up there with fish oil as one of the most important supplements to take on a daily basis,” Bowden concludes.

Natural Health Sherpa provides in-depth, science-based, independent reviews of natural health therapies and remedies that have been proven to be both safe and effective and are backed by good science — multiple double-blind, placebo-controlled, randomized studies. Unfortunately, there are many charlatans making bogus, unfounded claims in the natural health area, so our goal is to separate fact from fiction to pinpoint what actually works.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2012/6/prweb9641647.htm


Source: prweb



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