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A*STAR Scientists Make Groundbreaking Discovery of Mechanism that Controls Obesity, Atherosclerosis and Potentially Cancer

July 4, 2012

Singapore, July 4, 2012 – (ACN Newswire) – A*STAR scientists from the Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB) and the Singapore Bioimaging Consortium (SBIC) have discovered a new signalling pathway that controls both obesity and atherosclerosis. The team demonstrated, for the first time, that mice deficient in the Wip1 gene were resistant to weight gain and atherosclerosis via regulation of the Ataxia telangiectasia mutated gene (ATM) and its downstream signalling molecule mTor. These groundbreaking findings were published in thejournal Cell Metabolism on 3rd July and may provide significant new avenues for therapeutic interventions for obesity and atherosclerosis.

Obesity and atherosclerosis-related diseases account for over one-third of deaths in the Western world. Controlling these conditions remains a major challenge due to an incomplete understanding of the molecular pathways involved. Atherosclerosis, a progressive disease of the large arteries, is an underlying cause of many cardiovascular diseases. In Singapore, 10.8% of our population is obese(1) and cardiovascular disease accounted for 31.9% of all deaths(2) in 2010.

Obesity and atherosclerosis are accompanied by the accumulation of lipid droplets in adipocytes (fat cells) and in foam cells respectively. Foam cells can subsequently rupture, damaging blood vessels, and contributing to further progression of atherosclerosis. The scientists discovered that Wip1 deficient mice, even when fed a high-fat diet, were resistant to obesity and atherosclerosis by preventing the accumulation of lipid droplets. This appeared to be through increased autophagy, the normal process by which the body degrades its own cellular components. They showed that the Wip1 deficient mice exhibited increased activityof ATM which decreased mTor signalling, resulting in increased autophagy. This degraded the lipid droplets and suppressed obesity and atherosclerosis.

“This is the first time that Wip1-dependent regulation of ATM-mTor pathway has been linked to authophagy and cholesterol efflux thus providing an entirely new avenue for treatment of obesity and atherosclerosis,” said Dr Dmitry Bulavin, Senior Principal Investigator at IMCB and lead author of this paper.

Mapping the mechanism to cancer

The scientists are hopeful that this ATM-mTor pathway could similarly map onto cancer to suppress tumour progression. Similar to suppression of obesity and atherosclerosis, activation of autophagy in cancer cells could result in degradation of cellularcontent that is essential for cancer cells to sustain rapid proliferation. This, in turn, will result in suppression of cancer growth.

Said Dr Dmitry Bulavin, “We are building on this research to investigate if the same mechanism could also control tumour progression and hence potentially unlock new therapeutic treatments targeting Wip1, ATM and mTor in cancer as well and the preliminary results are promising.”

This discovery also adds to the growing significance of ATM as an importantgene with a key role in protecting us from major pathological conditions. Previous work has established Wip1-dependent regulation of ATM as a potent regulator of tumorigenesis via activation of tumour-suppressor p53. Together, these three pathological conditions – obesity, atherosclerosis and cancer – account for more than 70% of mortality worldwide, making ATM-related pathways very attractive therapeutic targets.

Prof Hong Wanjin, Executive Director of IMCB, said, “This is the first time that these important molecules have been integrated into a linear pathway that plays a prominent role in controlling obesity and atherosclerosis. It is a fine example of how fundamental research can shed light on biological and medical questions to potentially open new avenues of formulating therapeutic strategies for the benefit of patients.”

Notes for Editor:

The research findings described in this news release can be found in the July 3rd print issue of Cell Metabolism under the title “Wip1-dependent regulation of autophagy, obesity and atherosclerosis” by Xavier Le Guezennec[1], Anna Brichkina[1], Yi-Fu Huang[1], Elena Kostromina[2], Weiping Han[2], Dmitry V Bulavin[1].
[1] Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, 61 Biopolis Drive, Proteos 138673, Singapore
[2] Laboratory of Metabolic Medicine, Singapore Bioimaging Consortium, Biomedical Sciences Institutes, 11 Biopolis Way, Helios 138667, Singapore

(1) www.moh.gov.sg/content/moh_web/home/statistics/Health_Facts_Singapore.html
(2) www.myheart.org.sg/heart-facts/statistics/

About Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB)

The Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology (IMCB) is a member of Singapore’s Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) andis funded through A*STAR’s Biomedical Research Council (BMRC). It is a world-class research institute that focuses its activities on six major fields: Cell Biology, Developmental Biology, Genomics, Structural Biology, Infectious Diseases, Cancer Biology and Translational Research, with core strengths in cell cycling, cell signalling, cell death, cell motility and protein trafficking. Its achievements include leading an international consortium that successfully sequenced the entire pufferfish (fugu) genome. The IMCB was awarded the Nikkei Prize 2000 for Technological Innovation in recognition of its growth into a leading international research centre and its collaboration with industry and research institutes worldwide. Established in 1987,the Institute currently has 26 independent research groups, eight core facilities and 300 researchers. For more information about IMCB, please visit www.imcb.a-star.edu.sg

About the Singapore Bioimaging Consortium (SBIC)

The Singapore Bioimaging Consortium (SBIC) is a research consortium of the Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) in Singapore. SBIC aims to build a coordinated national programme for imaging research, bringing together substantial strengths in the physicalsciences and engineering and those in the biomedical sciences. It seeks to identify and consolidate the various bioimaging capabilities across local research institutes, universities and hospitals, in order to speed the development of biomedical research discoveries. SBIC has built up an extensive network of partners, through collaborations and joint appointments with research institutes, university and clinical departments, and the industry. Its partners include the Singapore Institute for Clinical Sciences, the NUS Chemistry Department, the National Cancer Centre, Duke-NUS, Agilent, Bruker, Bayer, GlaxoSmithKline, Takeda, and Merck. For more information about SBIC, please visit www.sbic.a-star.edu.sg.

About A*STAR

The Agency for Science, Technology and Research (A*STAR) is the lead agency for fostering world-class scientific research and talent for a vibrant knowledge-based and innovation-driven Singapore. A*STAR oversees 14 biomedical sciences and physical sciences and engineering research institutes, and six consortia and centres, located in Biopolis and Fusionopolis as well as their immediate vicinity. A*STAR supports Singapore’s key economic clusters by providing intellectual, human and industrial capital to its partners in industry. It also supports extramural research in universities, hospitals, research centres, and with other local and international partners. For more information about A*STAR, visit www.a-star.edu.sg .

Source: A*STAR

Contact:

Ong Siok Ming (Ms)
Senior Officer, Corporate Communications
Agency for Science, Technology and Research
Tel: +65 6826 6254
Email: ong_siok_ming@a-star.edu.sg>

Copyright 2012 ACN Newswire. All rights reserved.


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