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Natural Sciences Repository Publishes Acid Residues and Acid Sequence Resources

September 6, 2012

The novel Natural Sciences Repository aims to provide reliable information on various areas of scientific interest and presents its content in the simplest words and terms possible. The site has now added the categories Acid Residues and Acid Sequence to its Acid section. The first new category contains scientific information on amino acid residues, which are a by-product of the peptide formation process whereas the second newly included category contains scientific information on Acid Sequence, which is generally the order in which amino or nucleic acids occur.

Bad Honnef, Germany (PRWEB) September 05, 2012

The aim of the Repository for Natural Sciences is to provide reliable information on various areas of scientific interest in a format that can be digested easily. The information is presented in the simplest words and terms possible and that can be easily searched for within the website.

The section Acids contains scientific information about acids, its kinds, and naming acidic substances. While there are three basic definitions for acids, the Arrhenius, the BrØnsted-Lowry, and the Lewis definitions, acids are named according to their anions, with the ionic suffix typically dropped and replaced with a new one. After inclusion of the two new categories, this section contains ten categories including Chromatography, Compounds, Diet, Enzyme, Fatty, Glucose, Lipid, Metabolism, Residues and Sequence. Users can receive alerts for newly published content in this section by subscribing to the Acids RSS feed.

The newly published category Acid Residues contains scientific information on amino acid residues, which are a by-product of the peptide formation process. An amino acid is a molecule with an amine group, a carboxylic acid group, and a side chain specific to each amino acid present in the molecule. They occur naturally in both plant and animal tissues and are also the basic constituents of proteins. While some amino acid residues are called N terminal and can be found at the N terminus, amino acids with a free carboxyl group are called C terminal. The category currently contains ca. 650 articles including one on DNA-fiber EPR investigation of the influence of amino-terminal residue stereochemistry on the DNA binding orientation of CuIIcenter dot Gly-Gly-His-derived metallopeptides. Another article demonstrates the determination of Kaposis sarcoma-associated herpesvirus C-terminal latency-associated nuclear antigen residues mediating chromosome association and DNA binding. The article on engineering of Pseudomonas aeruginosa lipase by directed evolution for enhanced amidase activity mechanistic implication for amide hydrolysis by serine hydrolases revealed that the amidase activity was increased by the increase in the catalytic efficiency (k(cat)). The increase in k(cat) suggested the importance of the leaving group protonation by the catalytic His during the break down of the tetrahedral intermediate in the hydrolysis of amides. Users can receive alerts for newly published content in this category by subscribing to the Acid Residues RSS feed.

The new Acid Sequence category contains scientific information on the order in which amino or nucleic acids occur. A nucleic acid sequence makes up the primary structure of a nucleic acid. It is the sequence of atoms that make up the acid and subsequently, the chemical bonds that bind these atoms together. The acid sequence is also used in biological and biochemical study to represent genetic information. On the other hand, an amino acid sequence is the order where amino acid residues, which are connected by peptide bonds, lie in a chain made up of peptides and proteins. The category currently contains ca. 300 articles including one presenting a novel WX mutation caused by insertion of a retrotransposon-like sequence in a glutinous cultivar of rice (Oryza sativa). Another article describes a calibration-curve-free quantitative PCR A quantitative method for specific nucleic acid sequences without using calibration curves. Users can receive alerts for newly published content in this category by subscribing to the Acid Sequence RSS feed.

The repository groups information in the natural sciences according to interrelated sections and categories that will help readers understand the context of whatever topic is searched information on. It is composed of eleven sections which are subdivided into up to ten categories. Each unit contains a definition composed in an understandable way. Each item in these sections and categories contains up to twenty clickable tags.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2012/9/prweb9865729.htm


Source: prweb



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