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Last updated on April 20, 2014 at 8:28 EDT

A New Pest For The Midsouth

October 1, 2012

Tadpole shrimp are pests of rice production systems in California and have recently been found impacting Missouri and Arkansas rice fields. The shrimp feed on rice seedlings and uproot them during foraging, and their foraging behavior causes water to become muddy, which reduces light penetration to submerged seedlings and delays the development of the rice plant.

In “Review of a New Pest of Rice, Tadpole Shrimp (Notostraca: Triopsidae), in the Midsouthern United States and a Winter Scouting Method of Rice Fields for Preplanting Detection,” a new open-access article appearing in the Journal of Integrated Pest Management, the authors provide information on the life cycle of tadpole shrimp, describe a new method for scouting for tadpole shrimp in rice fields, and provide scouting results and management implications.

In the article, the authors discuss the tadpole shrimp’s biology, life cycle, and distribution range, as well as options for controlling it. The authors also note that after the rice seedling stage, tadpole shrimp can be beneficial because they also eat weed seedlings and small insects.

The Journal of Integrated Pest Management is an open-access, peer-reviewed, extension journal covering the field of integrated pest management. The intended readership for the journal is any professional who is engaged in any aspect of integrated pest management, including, but not limited to, crop producers, individuals working in crop protection, retailers, manufacturers and suppliers of pest management products, educators, and pest control operators.

JIPM is published by the Entomological Society of America (ESA), the largest organization in the world serving the professional and scientific needs of entomologists and people in related disciplines. Founded in 1889, ESA today has more than 6,000 members affiliated with educational institutions, health agencies, private industry, and government. Members are students, researchers, teachers, extension service personnel, administrators, marketing representatives, research technicians, consultants, and hobbyists. For more information, please visit http://www.entsoc.org.

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