Quantcast

Respected Astronomy Journal Gets New Editor

November 21, 2012

Jeffrey Mangum, a scientist at the National Radio Astronomy Observatory (NRAO) headquarters in Charlottesville, Virginia, has been appointed Editor of the Publications of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (PASP), a peer-reviewed scientific journal. The tenth editor in PASP’s 125-year history, Mangum will continue in his position on the NRAO’s scientific staff, where he has worked fulltime since 1994.

PASP is a publication of the Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP), a nonprofit education and outreach organization headquartered in San Francisco. The journal occupies a position in astronomical literature that appeals to Mangum. “I specialize in developing advanced astronomical instrumentation, and PASP is one of the top places for instrument and software developers in astronomy to rigorously document and disseminate their contributions to the field,” he said.

Mangum also leads the NRAO summer student program and contributes to other educational and outreach activities at the Observatory, activities well-aligned with the ASP’s goal to advance science literacy through astronomy.

“PASP is the only peer-reviewed scientific journal specializing in astrophysical research that commits all of its net income to the advancement of science education,” Mangum continued. “It is great to know that in my work as editor I will be contributing to ASP’s education mission.”

Commenting on Dr. Mangum’s appointment, ASP Executive Director Jim Manning said, “We are delighted to have a scientist of Jeff’s experience and professional stature at the editorial helm of PASP. With the tremendous resurgence that radio astronomy is enjoying through the new telescopes that NRAO is bringing on-line, it’s a fitting time to welcome our first-ever PASP editor from the radio astronomy community.”

Mangum succeeds Paula Szkody of the University of Washington, who has edited PASP since 2005.

Founded in 1889 in San Francisco, the ASP is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization with a mission to increase the understanding and appreciation of astronomy–by engaging scientists, educators, enthusiasts and the public — to advance science and science literacy. The ASP publishes both scholarly and educational materials, conducts professional development programs for formal and informal educators, and holds conferences, symposia and workshops for astronomers and educators specializing in education and public outreach. The ASP’s programs are funded by individual donors and members, corporations, foundations, the National Science Foundation and NASA among others.

On the Net:




comments powered by Disqus