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Hixenbaugh Ancient Art Presents Recently Acquired Antiquities, Including Greek Terracotta Heads

December 8, 2012

Hixenbaugh Ancient Art recently updated its website with over fifty recently acquired objects including Greek terracotta heads, ancient jewelry, Roman oil lamps, Roman glass, ancient coins, Egyptian antiquities and Greek vases.

New York, New York (PRWEB) December 07, 2012

Hixenbaugh Ancient Art Ltd recently updated its web site to include over 50 recently acquired objects. Most of the objects are affordably priced, representing many ancient cultures and are excellent thought-provoking gift ideas for the holiday season.

Often, it is assumed that collecting ancient art is an expensive proposition. While many fine and rare antiquities do command high prices, many ancient pieces are surprisingly affordable. Our recent acquisitions demonstrate that collecting ancient art can be done within any budget, with many objects priced at only a few hundred dollars or even less.

Among the newly acquired items are various Greek terracotta heads and ancient jewelry. Terracotta figures were used in shrines, as household decorations or even toys. Terracotta figurines offered an affordable decorative alternative to larger marble statues even in antiquity. Ancient jewelry represents a direct link to the past as the form and function has remained relatively consistent through the passage of time. The beauty of fine gems, precious metals, glass beads and amulets is timeless. Many ancient items of jewelry can still be worn today and some need only to be restrung with modern material.

Another direct link to the past is Roman oil lamps and Roman glass. Both represent common everyday items that possess unique artistic sense of style. When holding an oil lamp one can imagine our forbearers using the object to illuminate their surroundings on a dark night thousands of years ago. Holding delicate Roman glass, one is always amazed at how it has withstood the ravages of time and maintained its simply elegant design.

In the opinion of gallery director, Randall Hixenbaugh, “Everyday objects of antiquity provide a special bond to the past as we can still relate to their functionality in the present. These objects will undoubtedly out live those of us who collect them, but we become links in a chain, preserving the past for future generations”. These newly acquired items as well as many other important antiquities are on view and available at our New York gallery (Tuesday — Saturday 11am — 6pm) and can be viewed on our web site

ABOUT HIXENBAUGH ANCIENT ART

Hixenbaugh Ancient Art Ltd, located on the Upper East Side of Manhattan, is dedicated to handling fine authentic antiquities (Roman, Egyptian, Near Eastern, Neolithic and Greek Art). All of the pieces we handle are legally acquired, in complete accordance with US and international regulations and laws concerning the import and sale of ancient objects. All objects are guaranteed genuine and as described. Hixenbaugh Ancient Art is a member of the Art and Antique Dealers League of America (AADLA), the Confederation Internationale des Negociants en Oeuvres d’Art (CINOA), Appraisers Association of America, and the International Association of Dealers in Ancient Art (IADAA).

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At Hixenbaugh Ancient Art, we believe that responsible collecting of antiquities is not only a pleasurable pursuit and wise investment, but an important responsibility. Today’s collectors are custodians of the past, links in a chain, preserving the past for future generations by passing their collections on to their heirs, reselling them to eager collectors, or donating them to museums. In doing so, the collector of ancient art reaps the many benefits of acquiring truly unique and thought provoking objects that have come down to us from the ancients, whose influences pervade every aspect of the modern world.

If you would like more information about this topic contact Robert O´Donnell or Randall Hixenbaugh at (212) 861 – 9743 or info(at)hixenbaugh(dot)net

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2012/12/prweb10208252.htm


Source: prweb