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Water Researcher Sharon Kleyne Reports Best Methods to Reduce Summer Garden Watering

June 12, 2013

News from Sharon Kleyne on Summer Gardens, Soil Moisture and Organic Content

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) June 12, 2013

Water Researcher Sharon Kleyne recently reported on the best strategy to improve the quality and yield of summer gardens while greatly reducing the need for watering to increase soil moisture. According to Kleyne, gardeners and farmers have known about composting and mulching for thousands of years but only recently have the full range of benefits been discovered.

As Founder of the Bio-Logic Aqua Research Center, Sharon Kleyne has been researching water, moisture and the environment for three decades. Bio-Logic Aqua Research bottles the product Natures Tears® EyeMist®. As part of Mrs. Kleyne´s commitment to education, she has hosted the syndicated talk radio show Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water since 2007. The show is heard live or by podcast on VoiceAmerica, Apple iTunes and Green Talk Network

A “mulch” is a layer of organic material, such as bark chips, placed on top of the soil to help retain water and moisture, reduce weeds and improve growth. Plastic sheeting is considered as mulch. “Compost” is partly decomposed organic material, such as garbage or leaves, that is mixed in with the soil. Many communities have wood waste recycling operations that sell wood compost.

Composting and mulching, says Kleyne, are best for summer gardens because they add organic content to soils. Kleyne cites a statement by dry land farm researcher Dr. Fred Kirschenmann: “It isn´t the amount of watering given to a farm or garden that creates healthy crops it´s the quality of the soil.” With one-percent organic content, soil can hold 33 pounds of water per cubic yard. With five-percent organic content, soil can hold an amazing 195 pounds of water per cubic yard. The national average is 2.2 percent organic content and the best attainable is about 6.5%.

Even where water conservation is not an issue, hot, dry summer days, especially when the air is polluted and the humidity is low, can quickly dehydrate garden plants, and they may require watering two or three times a day. With the best healthy soils and high organic content, extra watering and moisture should not be necessary.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2013/6/prweb10824539.htm


Source: prweb