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Never Expose Skin to Daylight without Sunscreen Warns Water and Skin Researcher Sharon Kleyne

June 18, 2013

Global Drought and UV Radiation Makes Sunscreen Critical to Skin Cancer Prevention Reports Sharon Kleyne.

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) June 18, 2013

New research is revealing that no matter what the weather or season, exposing skin to daylight without sunscreen is never a good idea. According to water and skin researcher Sharon Kleyne, in this era of increasing global drought, solar radiation and thinning ozone, sunscreen is becoming as important to personal health and grooming as toothpaste, lip balm or eye mist.

As Founder of the Bio-Logic Aqua Research Center, Sharon Kleyne has been researching water and skin for three decades. Bio-Logic Aqua Research bottles the product Natures Tears® EyeMist®. As part of Mrs. Kleyne´s commitment to water and health education, she has hosted the syndicated talk radio show Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water since 2007. The show is heard live or by podcast on VoiceAmerica, Apple iTunes and Green Talk Network.

The primary benefit of sunscreen, according to Kleyne, is protecting the skin from ultraviolet or UV radiation, most prevalent in visible daylight. UV radiation is the best known cause of the three major skin cancers: Basal cell carcinoma, which is not fatal but can be disfiguring; squamous cell carcinoma, also not fatal but disfiguring; and malignant melanoma, fatal if not caught in time.

Sharon Kleyne is Founder of the Save-a-Child´s Life Foundation to prevent childhood melanoma.

All three cancers, says Kleyne, occur primarily on areas most exposed to sun such as the nose, cheeks, hands and forearms. Although cancer in general is declining in the US, skin cancer is increasing at a rate of 4.2% per year and has become the most common US cancer, with 3.5 million reported cases per year. There are 9,000 deaths per year from malignant melanoma.

Any exposure to UV radiation, Kleyne had discovered, has the potential to cause skin damage and the damage can be cumulative. Kleyne cites research indicating that sunburn and skin DNA damage from UV radiation in childhood can develop into melanoma as much as 40 years later. Research also suggests that tanning beds, winter sun and overcast daylight may also expose the skin to dangerous UV radiation. Sunscreen, says Kleyne, effectively prevents squamous cell carcinoma and malignant melanoma but may be less effective with basal cell carcinoma.

Sharon Kleyne recommends frequent use of sunscreen combined with other strategies such as sun protective clothing. Skin hydration or water content is also important because dehydrated skin is believed more susceptible to sunburn and UV radiation damage. Kleyne suggests applying a sunscreen lotion to face, hands and arms following every bath. This not only provides sun protection but helps seal in skin moisture. For women, she recommends make-up with a sun protection or SPF rating. And finally, she urges the application of sunscreen to exposed skin whenever you go outside, summer or winter, rain or shine, as long as there is daylight. This should become habitual and automatic, like putting on a jacket.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/prweb2013/6/prweb10843246.htm


Source: prweb