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The Justice Project Introduces “What Justice Means to Me” Video Series

June 28, 2013

The Justice Project kicks off new video series on “What Justice Means to Me” starting with a definition from Angelo “Barefoot Pookie” White the Crips Street gang Founder

Santa Barbara, California (PRWEB) June 28, 2013

The Justice Project has launched a new video series to initiate a dialogue about justice from outside of academic parameters and normative social boundaries. This series kicks off with Executive Director Noah benShea interviewing Angelo “Barefoot Pookie” White, the Founder of the Crips Street Gang on what justice means to him. Set in Angelo’s home in Watts, California, Noah and Angelo share a frank and intimate discussion about the history of street violence in Los Angeles, alternative directions for disenfranchised youth, and what justice means to Angelo.

When asked what justice meant to him, Angelo answered succinctly and with poignant candor by saying “it is ‘just us.’” From this perspective, justice becomes defined by how you and your immediate ‘gang’ of fellow aspirants overcome the societal obstacles that prevent your attainment of a more equitable life. Additionally, those on the upper end of the economic ladder act to serve individual interests in a “just us” mentality.

With this subjectivity of justice in mind, The Justice Project moves forward with broadcasting definitions of justice from those outside of traditional panelists and mainstream scholars. “What is both insightful and painful about the redefinition of justice as ‘just us’ is the operating presumption of inherent self-interest only. What is worrisome as a social diagnosis is how many on hearing this redefinition will nod, ‘Yep. That’s the way it is.’ In a world of ‘I got mine Jack,’ the cost is a violation of every social contract of cross-caring,” states The Justice Project Executive Director, Noah benShea.

Following the interview with Angelo White, The Justice Project will broadcast definitions of justice from a unique spectrum of individuals, including extreme athletes and the director of a youth gang ministry. In addition, The Justice Project welcomes submissions from the public, with an open invitation to people from all walks of life to submit a video of what justice means to you. Through dialogue, The Justice Project intends to break the boundaries separating “just us” from “all of us.” Videos can be submitted through The Justice Project website contact page or emailed directly.

About The Justice Project

The Justice Project is an interactive platform that initiates dialogue and broadcasts calls to action by lending an ear to, and giving a voice for, just causes in educational, economic, environmental and social justice. To learn more, or to schedule an interview with Executive Director Noah benShea please visit The Justice Project website, or engage socially on Facebook.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/WhatJusticeMeanstoMe/TheJusticeProject06282013/prweb10886001.htm


Source: prweb



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