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UNIST: Direct Nitrogen Fixation for Low Cost Energy Conversion

July 23, 2013

Ulsan, South Korea, July 23, 2013 – (ACN Newswire) – A simple, low-cost and eco-friendly method of creating nitrogen-doped graphene nanoplatelets (NGnPs), which could be used in dye-sensitized solar cells and fuel cells, is published in Scientific Reports today. The work, carried out at Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) in South Korea, could be a step towards replacing conventional platinum (Pt)-based catalysts for energy conversion.

The search for economically viable alternatives to fossil fuels has attracted attention among energy communities because of increasing energy prices and climate change. Solar cells and fuel cells are to be promising alternatives, but Pt-based electrodes are expensive and susceptible to environmental damage.

Nitrogen fixation is where nitrogen (N2) in the atmosphere is converted into ammonia (NH3). Fixation processes free up nitrogen atoms from their diatomic form to be used in other ways, but nitrogen does not easily react with other chemicals to form new compounds.

The most common method of industrial nitrogen fixation is the Harber-Bosch process, which requires extremely harsh conditions, 200 atm of pressure and 400 degrees C of temperature.

The UNIST team previously reported that dry ball-milling can efficiently produce chemically modified graphene particles in large quantities*. This research, in Scientific Reports, presents another innovation to improve the materials. Along the way, the research team discovered a novel nitrogen fixation process.

They focus on modifications with nitrogen, developing a technique with direct nitrogen fixation, carbon-nitrogen bond formation, at the broken edges of graphite frameworks using ball-milling graphite in the presence of nitrogen gas.

The research was led by Jong-Beom Baek, professor and director of the Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy/Low-Dimensional Carbon Materials Center, UNIST, Liming Dai, professor of Case Western Reserve University and Noejung Park, professor of the Interdisciplinary School of Green Energy, UNIST.

“Nitrogen is the most abundant constituent in air and it is inert diatomic gas while graphite is the most thermodynamically stable form of carbon allotropes,” said Prof. Baek. “It is an extreme challenge for the C-N bond formation directly from graphite and nitrogen.”

This research was supported by World Class University (WCU), US-Korea NBIT, Mid-Career Researcher (MCR), Converging Research Center (CRC) and Basic Research Laboratory (BRL) programs through the National Research Foundation (NRF), of Korea funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (Minister Choi Mun-Kee), US Air Force Office of Scientific Research through Asian Office of Aerospace R&D (AFOSR-AOARD), and AFOSR.

Image captions
Image 1: Diagram of Direct Nitrogen Fixation on Graphene Nanoplates
Image 2: Prof. Jong-Beom Baek

The work was published in Scientific Reports (Nature Publishing Group).
Title: Direct nitrogen fixation at the edges of graphene nanoplatelets as efficient electrocatalysts for energy conversion. The research paper is available from this link: www.nature.com/srep/2013/130723/srep02260/full/srep02260.html

Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST) http://www.unist.ac.kr

Homepage of Prof. Jong-Beom Baek http://jbbaek.unist.ac.kr/index.sko

Homepage of Prof. Noejung Park http://dkphysics.cafe24.com/sub_kor/index.php

* “Edge-carboxylated graphene nanosheets via ball milling”, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, USA 109, 5588-5593 (2012)

Contact:

Ms Eunhee Song
International Press Officer
Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST)
Email: ehsong@unist.kr
Tel: +82 1050 380428 (mobile) or +82 5221 71224 (office)



Source: Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST)

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