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Humid Air May Be More Dehydrating than Dry Air Reports Water and Health Researcher Sharon Kleyne

July 31, 2013

Hot humid air creates more perspiration, says Sharon Kleyne.

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) July 31, 2013

One would think that being in hot, dry air would cause the human body to lose more water than being in hot, humid air. And it is true that hot dry air does tend to draw more water out of moist objects than does hot humid air. According to water and health researcher Sharon Kleyne, other factors must also be considered. Kleyne has concluded that in fact, the presence of hot, humid air is more likely, not less likely, to cause physical dehydration and heat stroke in humans.

Sharon Kleyne is Founder of Bio-Logic Aqua Research, a water and health research and product development center that developed and markets the 100% water personal humidifying products Natures Tears® EyeMist® and Nature’s Mist® skin moisture. Kleyne hosts the globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water® radio show on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes.

Kleyne points out that from the moment of birth, the body begins a lifelong dehydration process. The challenge to every living organism is to do everything possible to slow that process. In Earth’s increasingly polluted, overcrowded environment, with greater climatic extremes, human survival may depend on the ability to recognize and counteract early dehydration symptoms.

According to Kleyne, one of the most dehydrating bodily functions is perspiration. Perspiration is the body’s primary means of cooling itself and also plays a role in detoxification. Perspiration is 98% water and the rest is salt, oil, minerals and urea, a waste product from the blood.

The perspiration reflex, Kleyne explains, is triggered by three factors, an increase in the body’s core temperature as a result of fever or overwork, stress, and high surrounding temperatures. The water in the perspiration evaporates on the skin, causing the skin to cool as heat energy moves from the skin surface to the water to the air. The cooled skin then cools the venous capillaries, which eventually cools the body core.

Evaporation is always faster in dry air and in a hot but very humid situation, the water in the perspiration will evaporate much more slowly, if at all. When the humidity is too high, according to Kleyne, the body may be unable to cool itself in hot weather because no evaporation takes place. Under these circumstances, the body will continue to generate perspiration until there is simply no water left and the body is almost completely dehydrated. At that point, heat stroke sets in, which can be life threatening.

Kleyne explains that the solutions to dehydration from excessive perspiration are, (1) to remove oneself, if possible, from the situation causing the sweating and (2) to replace the lost water – and lost salt – as quickly as possible. Since the water in perspiration comes from the blood and not the skin, replacing the water by drinking is essential. Kleyne recommend drinking at least 8 to 10 glasses of water per day, in addition to all other fluids, and more when you perspire. The glasses should be pure fresh water with no additives. Kleyne notes that warm water is absorbed more quickly than cold water but does not cool quite as rapidly.

One of the earliest noticeable dehydration complaints, Kleyne points out, is dry, irritated, burning or itching eyes. While the water in perspiration comes from the blood, hot dry air also dehydrate the skin and eyes. Salt residue from dried perspiration is further dehydrating to skin and eyes.

To avoid eye and skin dehydration and discomfort in hot weather, Sharon Kleyne recommends her company’s products Nature’s Tears® EyeMist® and Nature’s Mist® skin moisture. Both are completely safe, all-natural, and contain 100% trade secret tissue culture grade fresh water. The products are chemical free, non-allergenic and may be applied as often as necessary to keep skin and eyes moist and hydrated with "Just a Mist®" no matter what the weather.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/7/prweb10982117.htm


Source: prweb



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