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China Water and Air Pollution Impacts Food Supply Reports Water Advocate Sharon Kleyne

August 30, 2013

Long-term effects of China’s extreme water and air pollution continue to emerge, according to Sharon Kleyne, Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research.

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) August 30, 2013

Water pollution in China is so widespread and out of control that the country now has difficulty raising livestock, says Sharon Kleyne, the founder of water research company Bio Logic Aqua Research. According to a dailykos.com article (“China’s water pollution off the charts, must outsource food production,” 8/23/13), China’s once enviable agricultural output is increasingly outsourced because they no longer have enough water to raise livestock and the remaining water is seriously polluted.

Water and health advocate Sharon Kleyne believes that unless China takes drastic steps to repair their pollution problems, increasingly troubling effects will continue to emerge. High on the list, according to Kleyne, is the effect of industrial pollution on the air’s natural humidity or airborne water vapor. Polluted water vapor/humidity makes the air less breathable and more toxic, and could impact the global hydrological cycle and annual rainfall.

Sharon Kleyne is Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, a water and health research and product development center that markets the all-water eye and face humidifying product Natures Tears® EyeMist®. As part of an ongoing commitment to educating the public about the importance of water and health, Kleyne hosts the globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water® radio show on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes.

According to the Daily Kos article, much of China’s industrial production is coal powered, which requires a huge amount of water. Coal powered industrial production seriously pollutes the remaining water, rendering it unfit for either humans or livestock. That’s why China has begun outsourcing the production of foods such as pork.

Most of China’s major rivers, reports the Daily Kos article, are now too polluted to swim in and many minor rivers have dried up. Remember that China is a basically water rich country that obtains most if its water from the high Himalayas.

Another outcome of coal dependence, according to Sharon Kleyne, is the world’s highest rate of airborne soot, also called “carbon black.” When airborne carbon black particles are present in the atmosphere, they act as a nucleus in the formation of humidity droplets.

Kleyne reminds us that the air’s natural water vapor/humidity is essential to the health of the skin, eyes and lungs; and to all life. A significant portion of the body’s daily water intake, says Kleyne, comes from water vapor/humidity. Airborne water vapor droplets facilitate oxygen transfer in the lungs. Water vapor is also the most abundant and important greenhouse gas that warms the Earth and forms a ceiling enabling the formation of clouds and weather systems.

Stick a carbon particle in the center of each water vapor/humidity droplet and all sorts of unfortunate results ensue. Carbon black in the lungs can cause lung infections, cancer, asthma, COPD and cardiopulmonary disease. According to Kleyne, scientists have learned that the smallest carbon particles can pass through the lungs into the blood but the effects are as yet unknown.

In the eyes, Kleyne explains, carbon particles can cause irritation and dry eye disease that could lead to increased eye allergies, eye infections and blindness. The surface of the eye is 98% water, much of which is absorbed from the air. China leads the world in a severe type of eye infection not found in the United States.

According to DeWayne Cecil, PhD, retired Climatologist for NASA and NOAA and a frequent Sharon Kleyne Hour guest, an increase in the amount of suspended particulate matter in the atmosphere – and in the humidity – could significantly alter the role of atmospheric water vapor as a greenhouse gas. Some studies indicate that the greenhouse effect is increased, possibly leading to warming, greater weather extremes and alteration of the world’s hydrological cycle.

Dr. Cecil concludes, and Sharon Kleyne agrees, that the eventual long-term effect of airborne carbon black and other suspended particles on climate, weather, the environment, health, food production and life on Earth, is unknown.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/8/prweb11077206.htm


Source: prweb



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