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With Autumn Approaching, Increased Time Indoors Could Cause Dry Eye Complaints

September 6, 2013

Forced-Air Heating and Air Conditioning Dehydrate Eyes and Skin, Reports Water and Health Researcher Sharon Kleyne

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) September 06, 2013

With autumn approaching, daylight decreasing and temperatures dropping, people spend an increasing amount of time indoors. Water and health researcher Sharon Kleyne would like the public to be aware that indoor air is well known to be dehydrating to eyes and skin. According to Kleyne, prolonged exposure to the low humidity of climate controlled indoor air, from both forced-air heating and air-conditioning, could result in increased dry eye and dry skin complaints.

Sharon Kleyne is Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, a water and health research and product development center. Natures Tears® EyeMist®, her company’s global signature product for dry eye, is all-natural and contains 100% trade secret water. As part of an ongoing commitment to educating the public about the importance of water and health, Kleyne hosts the globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water® radio show on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes.

According to the London Daily Mail (3-20-07 “Is your office killing you?”), says Kleyne, “Offices with central heating have notoriously dry air, often causing dry skin and dehydration.” Kleyne adds that eyes are even more susceptible to dehydration than skin and that “dry air” is defined as air with low water vapor content or humidity.

Air conditioning may be even more dehydrating than central heating, says Kleyne, citing the same London Daily Mail article. According to the article, “The lining of the nose is covered with a thin layer of mucous that protects against infection. Since air conditioners extract moisture and humidity from the air, they may cause some drying of the protective mucous blanket and predispose us to infection.”

Both forced-air heating and air-conditioning are dehydrating to eyes and skin because they create movement in the air that increases the rate of heat transfer and moisture evaporation out of the skin. This is especially true then the air’s humidity and water vapor content are low. Add to that bacteria laden recirculated air and reduced humidity and the result can be quite uncomfortable.

The solution? In autumn or any other season, make sure fresh humid air from the outside is allowed into indoor space, says Kleyne, noting that insulated walls and windows often prevent fresh air from entering. Also recommended are house plants and bowls of water to raise the humidity/vapor level, and placing baffles on the forced-air vents so they don’t blow directly onto eyes and skin.

Above all, says Kleyne, be sure to drink at least eight glasses of pure water each and every day, in addition to all other fluid intake. This has many health benefits in addition to protection against dehydration from indoor dry air.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/9/prweb11097487.htm


Source: prweb