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Tear Film Evaporation Begins at Birth Water and Health Researcher Discovers

October 24, 2013

Dry Eye and Dehydration Are Ongoing Processes That Continue Throughout Life Reports Bio Logic Aqua Research Founder, Sharon Kleyne

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) October 24, 2013

From the moment of birth, reports noted water and health researcher Sharon Kleyne, our bodies, including skin and eyes, begin to lose water and dry out or dehydrate. It is basic physics that unless the surrounding humidity is 100%, liquid water will evaporate into gas. For an organism, including humans, to survive, this lost water must be constantly replenished. If the lost water is only partially replenished, symptoms of numerous dehydration diseases may appear. According to Kleyne, the first place this water loss is felt is the eyes.    

Sharon Kleyne is Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, a water and health research and product development center. Natures Tears® EyeMist® is the company’s global signature product for dry eyes and dry eyelids. Kleyne also hosts the globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water® radio show on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes.

In an age of worldwide air pollution, and increasing drought, says Kleyne, evaporative pressure is increased and the need to replace lost body and surface water is intensified.

According to Kleyne, liquid-to-gas interface can be measured in terms of “vapor pressure” that tells the liquid whether to remain liquid or to begin evaporating into the air (i.e., turning into vapor, or gas), and at what rate. The rate of liquid-to-gas transition is dependent on air and water temperature, and the air’s humidity or water content.

Water evaporates faster in warmer temperatures and dryer air. Water continues evaporating until either the water is gone or the vapor pressure “equilibrates,” which means the air is saturated and its relative humidity is 100%. In practical terms, air rarely reaches 100% humidity so wherever there is water, there is almost always at least a small amount of evaporation.

The human body tends to increase vapor pressure by warming the surrounding air (more so when the body temperature is elevated). In the eyes’ tear film, which is 98% water and essential to vision, water evaporates fairly rapidly. However, the tear film’s moisture (water) bearing “aqueous layer” is protected by an overlying lipid layer of oil and fat. A normal lipid layer reduces evaporation by as much as 95% to maintain wet and clear eyes.

In a normal eye, according to Kleyne, the evaporation rate from the ocular surface averages 15×10-2 grams/cm2/second, or 0.15 microliters (millionths of a liter) per minute. Evaporation accounts for 36% of the normal tear outflow.

Evaporation loss, according to Kleyne, dramatically increases in individuals with dry eye, especially when there is dysfunction of the lipid producing meibomian glands located in the eyelids.

Kleyne notes that 64% of tears exit the eyes through absorption. This is accomplished in two ways: Via the tear outflow ducts (“puncta”) into the nose, where they are swallowed, or through absorption into the conjunctiva, a mucous membrane located at the inside corner of each eye. Water can both enter and exit the tear film through the conjunctive.

To counteract the evaporative and dehydration process, Kleyne recommends drinking at least eight full glasses of 100% water each day, in addition to all other fluids. Where the is a high risk of skin or eye evaporation, Kleyne recommends room humidifying devices, frequent showers and the application of a moisture supplementing all-water mist such as Nature’s Tears® EyeMist®.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/10/prweb11264356.htm


Source: prweb



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