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World Series Pitcher has “Green” Glove Controversy after Game 1, Avomeen’s Chief Chemist Questions Cause

October 25, 2013

Social media exploded in controversy over what the “glowing green” spot was on Lester’s glove, the spot could be clearly seen on television shots during the game.

(PRWEB) October 25, 2013

Wednesday’s Game 1 of the World Series showcased a great pitching effort by Jon Lester. However, after the game Lester’s glove became the talk of the Internet and media. Social media exploded in controversy over what the “glowing green” spot was on Lester’s glove, the spot could be clearly seen on television shots during the game.

A Cardinal’s minor league left-hander, Tyler Melling, posted a tweet questioning the odd substance on Lester’s glove during the game. Melling has since removed the post, but not before attention was focused on Lester’s glove.

Lester has come out and said the substance was rosin, something available to pitchers behind the mound in baseball. The green glowing color is the oddity, as rosin does not appear green. Lester had nothing conclusive to say about the odd color other than, “I don’t know how that came about.” The odd substance caught another baseball fan’s attention.

Shri Thanedar Ph.D., Chief Chemist at Avomeen with over 20 years of experience in the chemical and material identification industry, saw the strange green glob and also wondered what was on the glove. Dr. Thanedar noted that “the material on the glove looked like a synthetic polymeric material such as a rosin, or higher molecular aliphatic wax like substance.” Thanedar further stated that it is unusual for the rosins to have a lime green color, and may indicate metal-based chemicals.

Shri Thanedar received his Ph.D. in polymer chemistry from Akron University, and has conducted research positions at the University of Michigan. Thanedar currently is the CEO and chief chemist at Avomeen Analytical Services, a chemical testing laboratory based in Ann Arbor, Michigan. The odd hue could mean the rosin used gave unknown advantages. A rule, specifically 8.02.4 in the Major League Baseball official rules, states “the pitcher shall not apply a foreign substance of any kind to the ball.”

After the game, Major League Baseball has stated that they found nothing wrong with the substance after reviewing the film of Wednesday’s game one of the series. The Cardinals have also stated that they felt nothing was wrong with the green substance seen on the glove.

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/10/prweb11271598.htm


Source: prweb



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