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Former NASA Climatologist L. DeWayne Cecil Joins Bio-Logic Aqua Research

October 29, 2013

Will team with Sharon Kleyne and others to study the impact of changes in atmospheric water vapor on human health.

Grants Pass, OR (PRWEB) October 29, 2013

Bio Logic Aqua Research Founder and Research Director Sharon Kleyne today announced the addition of Climatologist L. DeWayne Cecil, PhD, to her Research Center’s team. The team will study and report on changes in atmospheric water content, including water vapor and precipitation, as a result of climate variability and change, and their projected impact on human health. Both Cecil and Kleyne believe that far more research is necessary and that recent documented changes in the Earth’s atmospheric water vapor content could have a dramatic long-term impact on air quality, precipitation, agriculture, human health and human society.

L. DeWayne Cecil, PhD, has had a distinguished career as a Climatologist in academic, government and private research settings. He has been employed as a researcher for the USGS Water Resources Discipline, the NASA Earth Observation Satellite program, Director of NOAA’a Western Region Climate Services and most recently, Chief Climatologist for Global Science and Technology, Inc. of Ashville, NC.

Dr. Cecil believes that the primary threat to human health and survival at this time is the defunding of in-situ remote sensing and airborne observational networks.

Sharon Kleyne is Founder of Bio Logic Aqua Research, a water and health research and product development center. Natures Tears® EyeMist® is the company’s global signature product for dry eyes and dry eyelids. Kleyne also hosts the globally syndicated Sharon Kleyne Hour Power of Water® radio show on VoiceAmerica and Apple iTunes.

According to Cecil, the purpose of the Bio-Logic Aqua Research project is, "to begin discussions of our state of knowledge of climate change impacts on targeted sectors across society with the goal of improving human responses, adaptations and planning. The project is meant to stimulate ideas for developing more complete and targeted information, data and tools on climate variability, change processes and impacts on selected systems and communities.

Sharon Kleyne’s interest in the role of fresh water and water vapor in human health began decades ago while studying the relationship between human stress levels and hydration. She discovered that although scientists are correct that fresh water is the basis of all terrestrial life on Earth, the water vapor in the air is even more essential. This is true for two reasons: (1) Without water vapor in the atmosphere, the water in our bodies would quickly evaporate. (2) Water vapor in the air is the source of all precipitation that feeds Earth’s fresh water lakes, streams and ground water.

According to Kleyne, scientists had researched the nature of fresh water and water’s impact on health for centuries, until about the mid-1800’s. At that time, the majority of scientific research became linked with patents and commercial marketability. There was less and less pure fresh water research because, as Kleyne states, "the money is in the patentable ingredients."

One result of Kleyne’s own research into atmospheric water vapor pressure and health is "Nature’s Tears® EyeMist®." The personal hand-held device supplies pure, pH balanced water as an ultra- fine mist to supplement water lost to evaporation in dry skin and dry eyes. Water in the skin and eyes may evaporate more quickly as a result of low humidity, the global fresh water crisis and increased contamination of the air’s water vapor.

Kleyne had long advocated the global research and educational project that she and Dr. Cecil will be undertaking. "I have been advocating this for decades and it is gratifying to see so many distinguished scientists such as Dr. Cecil and the other team members supporting this position."

For the original version on PRWeb visit: http://www.prweb.com/releases/2013/10/prweb11278560.htm


Source: prweb